Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Kentucky Geological Survey involved in global climate change research

15.07.2005


Researchers at the Kentucky Geological Survey are studying options to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is produced by the burning of coal, gasoline, and natural gas and has been linked to global warming. Sequestration involves the injection of carbon dioxide gas captured from the burning of fossil fuels into underground geologic structures to store it rather than allow it to be released into the atmosphere. Potential geologic sites include deep saline aquifers, abandoned or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, coal beds, and organic-rich shales.



The Kentucky Geological Survey, a research and public service institute of the University of Kentucky, participated in two regional partnerships under Phase 1 of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Survey has been informed of continued funding as part of the Phase II in three regional partnerships.

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, lead by the Illinois State Geological Survey, is studying opportunities to sequester carbon in Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, lead by the Battelle Institute, is studying the Appalachian and Michigan areas of the eastern and northeastern United States for sequestration options.


With these consortia, the Kentucky Geological Survey will be continuing the study of subsurface formations statewide in which carbon dioxide might be sequestered.

Another group, the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is led by the Southern States Energy Board and is studying an eleven-state region from the Texas Gulf Coast to Florida. In cooperation with this consortium, the Kentucky Geological survey will investigate coals along the Virginia-Kentucky border that might be useful for sequestration and the possibility for enhanced recovery of coalbed methane that would be displaced by the injection of carbon dioxide. This process could eventually become an attractive economic incentive for carbon sequestration.

All of these studies involve identifying large point sources of carbon emissions, assessing terrestrial and geologic opportunities for carbon storage, examining transportation issues, and evaluating public health and safety.

In Phase II research, pilot projects to test underground storage concepts will be initiated. In a separate project, the Kentucky Geological Survey has recently received U.S. Department of Energy funding to gather data on the amount of carbon dioxide and other gases that naturally migrate between soils and the atmosphere. These background data will be useful for monitoring geologic storage sites. The data collected will enable investigators to distinguish natural changes in carbon dioxide concentrations from potential surface seeps that could occur when carbon dioxide is injected underground for storage.

Other ongoing research at the Survey indicates natural gas production may be enhanced by injection and sequestration of carbon dioxide into organic-rich gas shales. On this topic, research is now focused on studying the efficiency and practicality of this carbon dioxide storage opportunity. Estimates compiled to date indicate that the geologic formations in Kentucky could theoretically sequester up to 33 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide. These new research efforts will help to refine our knowledge and determine which formations will actually be suitable for such uses.

For more information on this research by the Kentucky Geological Survey, see http://www.mrcsp.org, http://www.secarbon.org, http://www.sequestration.org, and http://www.uky.edu/KGS/emsweb/devsh/devshseq.html or contact Jim Drahovzal, drahovzal@uky.edu.

Ralph Derickson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uky.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht NASA eyes Pineapple Express soaking California
24.02.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht 'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field
23.02.2017 | Tokyo Institute of Technology

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>