Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

International Science Team Measures Arctic’s Atmosphere

31.01.2005


An international team of scientists embarked this week on a journey to improve modeling of global-scale air quality and climate change predictions by conducting high quality measurements of the Arctic region’s atmosphere.



The Polar Aura Validation Experiment (PAVE) will gather information to validate data from NASA’s Aura satellite, launched in July 2004. PAVE is the third in a series of planned Aura validation and science missions. These missions will help understand the transport and transformation of gases and aerosols in the lower atmosphere (troposphere), and their exchange with those in the lower stratosphere, the layer just above the troposphere. PAVE takes place from Jan. 24 to Feb. 9.

"In addition to providing important validation for the various Aura data products, PAVE brings together a full NASA complement of space-based and suborbital measurements to study the atmospheric chemistry and transport of gases and aerosols in this sensitive region of our planet," said Dr. Michael Kurylo, Program Scientist for PAVE, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "The information from this campaign will aid in understanding how changing atmospheric composition, associated with climate change, might affect the recovery of the Earth’s ozone layer that is anticipated to occur over the next several decades," he said.


In particular, PAVE focuses on the Arctic region of the Northern Hemisphere, where winter chemistry has led to significant seasonal reduction of the stratospheric ozone layer in many years, over more than a decade. The ozone layer restricts the amount of the sun’s ultraviolet radiation that reaches the Earth. Depletion of this protective layer can have harmful effects on humans and other ecosystems.

NASA’s DC-8 flying laboratory and high-altitude balloons are collecting valuable science data, especially on ozone and ozone-destroying chemicals, using a suite of atmospheric remote sensing and "in situ" instruments. The aircraft, operated by NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., is flying the PAVE mission from Pease International Tradeport, Portsmouth, N.H. Balloons are being launched from the European Sounding Rocket Range (ESRANGE) facility in Sweden.

The study is focusing on obtaining in situ and remote sensing measurements of the arctic region for validation of the Aura satellite. Information gathered during PAVE will be combined with data from Aura to improve modeling of global-scale air quality, ozone and climate change predictions.

Instruments on board the DC-8 are characterizing upper tropospheric and stratospheric gases inside and outside the Arctic polar region to study ozone depletion chemistry. Such flights also permit measurement of the outflow of gases from the North American continent, thereby contributing to an understanding of how regional pollutants are distributed in the hemisphere.

Scientists will make remote sensing measurements (extending many kilometers away from the aircraft) of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, aerosols, temperature, nitric acid, HCl, ClO and other ozone-related chemicals. These are complemented by measurements of components such as ozone, methane, water vapor, carbon monoxide, nitric acid and nitrous oxide, in the atmosphere immediately surrounding the aircraft.

Major PAVE partners include the University of New Hampshire, Durham; University of California-Berkeley; University of Bremen, Germany; National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, Colo.; the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington; Koninklijk Netherlands Meteorological Institute; and Los Gatos Research, Inc., Mountain View, Calif.

Beth Hagenauer | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://aura.gsfc.nasa.gov/
http://cloud1.arc.nasa.gov/ave-polar/
http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA laser communications to provide Orion faster connections

30.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study

30.03.2017 | Studies and Analyses

Unique genome architectures after fertilisation in single-cell embryos

30.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>