Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Record Arctic ozone loss in 2011

06.04.2011
In March 2011 the satellite instruments SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 measured the lowest ozone values above the Arctic since the start of the European data record in 1995.

The origin of the strong ozone losses are very low temperatures in the stratosphere (about 20 km altitude) that release chlorine and bromine atoms from the chlorofluorocarbons (cfc) and related brominated substances emitted by humans and catalytically destroy ozone. The measurements by SCIAMACHY confirm high chlorine activation in March 2011.

Stratospheric temperatures in the Arctic are very variable from winter to winter. Last year temperatures and ozone above the Arctic were very high. The year-to-year variability is related to the global upper atmosphere circulation. In winters with a strong circulation more ozone is transported into high latitudes and polar stratospheric temperatures are getting higher resulting in less polar ozone depletion.

In the science community there is currently a debate on why just this Arctic winter was very cold. In a changing climate, it is expected that on average stratospheric temperatures cool which means more chemical ozone depletion will occur. On the other hand many studies show that the stratospheric circulation in the northern hemisphere may be enhanced in the future and consequently more ozone will be transported from the tropics into high latitudes and reduce ozone depletion. The measures by the Montreal protocol banning cfc’s and related species have succeeded in that the stratospheric halogen (chlorine and bromine) load is now slowly declining. Nevertheless strong chemical ozone depletion will still occur during unusually cold Arctic winters in coming decades.

The Institute of Environmental Physics of the University of Bremen (IUP) is routinely processing satellite data from GOME (since 1995), SCIAMACHY (since 2002), and GOME-2 (since 2007). IUP has initiated the GOME and SCIAMACHY projects. Spectral data from the satellite instruments are provided by ESA (GOME/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat) and EUMETSAT (GOME-2/Metop-A). Calculations using a chemistry-transport model at IUP have shown that about half of the Arctic ozone has been chemically depleted during this winter.

Contact:
Dr. Mark Weber
Institut für Umweltphysik
Universität Bremen FB1
Tel 0421/218-62080
weber@uni-bremen.de
Dr. Andreas Richter
Institut für Umweltphysik
Universität Bremen FB1
Tel 0421/218-62103
richter@iup.physik.uni-bremen.de
Prof. John P. Burrows
Institut für Umweltphysik
Universität Bremen FB1
Tel 0421/218-62100
burrows@iup.physik.uni-bremen.de
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMIF24SZLG_index_0.html

Eberhard Scholz | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-bremen.de

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system
21.07.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Scientists shed light on carbon's descent into the deep Earth
19.07.2017 | European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

24.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>