Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Three NASA Satellites Get Awesome Views of Super-Typhoon Choi-Wan

16.09.2009
NASA's Aqua, CloudSat and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) captured stunning satellite images and different views of Super Typhoon Choi-Wan this week. Aqua provided cloud temperatures, CloudSat provided a side look into the storm at convection, precipitation and hot towers, and TRMM provided a look at the extent and intensity of rainfall in Choi-Wan.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Choi-Wan on September 15 at 1:30 p.m. local time, and captured an infrared image of the storm using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. The infrared instrument provides valuable data on a tropical cyclone's cloud top temperatures.

They're important because they tell forecasters how high thunderstorms are, and the higher the thunderstorm, the more powerful it is, and the data helped forecasters see Choi-Wan's cloud tops were as cold as or colder than minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F).

AIRS infrared images depict different cloud temperatures in purple and blue. Those cloud that appear in purple on AIRS imagery have temperatures as cold as or colder than 220 degrees Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F). The blue areas are around 240 degrees Kelvin, or minus 27F. The colder the clouds are, the higher they are, and the more powerful the thunderstorms are that make up the cyclone. Areas that are false colored as purple, are where meteorologists would also find the "hot tower" clouds that the TRMM and CloudSat satellites see. In fact, in Choi-Wan, CloudSat identified several hot towers.

A hot tower is a tropical cumulonimbus cloud that penetrates the tropopause, i.e. it reaches out of the lowest layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, into the stratosphere. In the tropics, the tropopause typically lies at least 15 kilometers (over 9 miles high) above sea level. These towers are called "hot" because they rise high due to the large amount of latent heat released as water vapor condenses into liquid.

NASA's CloudSat satellite completed an eye overpass of Super Typhoon Choi-Wan in the Western Pacific Ocean on September 15, at 0352Z (Sept. 14 at 11:52 p.m.). The CloudSat overpass shows the vertical cross section right through the center of the storm. The eye center is free of cirrus clouds with eye wall edges sloping outwards towards the top of the storm and with hot towers on both sides.

Natalie D. Tourville, of the Atmospheric Science Department at Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colo. is a member of the CloudSat team. Tourville said, "The storm has a well developed, fully enclosed circular eye wall (red circle in the image) around the eye center with intense convection and precipitation (orange and red reflectivities) extending outwards. The Aqua Infrared (AIRS) depicts cloud cover throughout the overpass but the CloudSat image reveals moats (convection free areas) containing a thick cirrus canopy between the spiral rain bands."

This is one a few inner eye images CloudSat has managed to capture of a Category 5 tropical cyclone.

Data from TRMM over flights are used in making the rainfall analysis at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Md. The rainfall analysis showed that Choi-Wan is a large and well-organized. TRMM's Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar instruments revealed that Choi-Wan has bands of heavy rainfall.

NASA's TRMM satellite captured an image of Choi-Wan's rainfall on September 13, as it was approaching Super Typhoon status. Rainfall in some areas exceeded 50 mm/hr, that's almost 2 inches per hour!

NASA satellites provide daily information to the National Hurricane Center, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center, and the U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center, all of whom forecast tropical cyclones.

For more information and updates about Choi-Wan's intensity and status, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2009/h2009_Choi-Wan.html.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Rob Gutro | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nasa.gov
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2009/h2009_Choi-Wan.html

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Mountain glaciers shrinking across the West
23.10.2017 | University of Washington

nachricht Climate change weakens Walker circulation
20.10.2017 | MARUM - Zentrum für Marine Umweltwissenschaften an der Universität Bremen

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Flying: Efficiency thanks to Lightweight Air Nozzles

23.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Salmonella as a tumour medication

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

50th Anniversary at JULABO GmbH

23.10.2017 | Press release

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>