Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


NASA's TRMM Satellite and HS3 Mission Checking out Tropical Storm Humberto

NASA's TRMM satellite watched Tropical Storm Humberto's rainfall pick up over two days as it re-formed, and as part of NASA's HS3 mission, two of NASA's Global Hawk unmanned aircraft have been investigating the zombie storm. The two Global Hawks also celebrated a combined 100 flights.

NASA's Global Hawk 871 departed from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. today, Sept. 17, at 10 a.m. EDT from Runway 04. This marked the twenty-fifth flight for NASA 871. Meanwhile, NASA 872 was returning to home base after making its seventy-fifth flight. These flights over Tropical Storm Humberto brought forth the one-hundredth flight of NASA's Global Hawks.

The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Humberto on Sept. 17 at 4:29 UTC/12:289 a.m. EDT. The image showed the highest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures (purple) northeast of the center.

Image Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

NASA's Global Hawk 872 unmanned aircraft took off at 10:42 a.m. EDT from Runway 22 at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. on Sept. 16 to investigate Humberto and dispersed dropsondes throughout the storm. NASA 872 gathered data on the environment of the storm. Global Hawk aircraft are well-suited for hurricane investigations because they can fly for as long as 28 hours and over-fly hurricanes at altitudes greater than 60,000 feet (18.3 km).

Tropical storm Humberto had little deep convection and was classified by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) as a post-tropical cyclone on September 14, 2013. By September 16, Humberto was showing bursts of strong convection and thunderstorms were developing with heavy rainfall, so Humberto was again classified a tropical storm.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite observed Humberto on September 15, 2013 at 1652 UTC (12:52 p.m. EDT) and on September 16, 2013 at 1557 UTC (11:57 a.m. EDT). A comparison of the two TRMM orbits showed significant changes that occurred within Humberto in less than 24 hours. In the first orbit on September 15, 2013 Humberto's center of circulation was rain free and only contained a small area of convective rainfall that was located well to the north of Humberto's surface location. Areas of strong convective rainfall were associated with rebounding Tropical Storm Humberto when TRMM viewed the same area on September 16, 2013.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Humberto on Sept. 17 at 4:29 UTC/12:289 a.m. EDT. The image showed the highest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures were still east and northeast of the center and were dropping the heaviest rainfall. .

At 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17 the center of Tropical Storm Humberto was located near latitude 29.4 north and longitude 42.5 west, about 1070 miles/1,720 km west-southwest of the Azores Islands. Humberto's maximum sustained winds were near 45 mph/75 kph and the National Hurricane Center expects some slight strengthening. Humberto is moving to the north at 10 mph/17 kph and is expected to turn to the northwest and slow down before heading north again on Sept. 18.

HS3 is a mission that brings together several NASA centers with federal and university partners to investigate the processes that underlie hurricane formation and intensity change in the Atlantic Ocean basin. Among those factors, HS3 will address the controversial role of the hot, dry and dusty Saharan Air Layer in tropical storm formation and intensification and the extent to which deep convection in the inner-core region of storms is a key driver of intensity change. The HS3 mission will operate between Aug. 20 and Sept. 23.

Humberto is forecast to again become a post-tropical low in about four days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Rob Gutro | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Wandering greenhouse gas
16.03.2018 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System
14.03.2018 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

Im Focus: ILA 2018: Laser alternative to hexavalent chromium coating

At the 2018 ILA Berlin Air Show from April 25–29, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is showcasing extreme high-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA): A video documents how for metal components that are highly loaded, EHLA has already proved itself as an alternative to hard chrome plating, which is now allowed only under special conditions.

When the EU restricted the use of hexavalent chromium compounds to special applications requiring authorization, the move prompted a rethink in the surface...

Im Focus: Radar for navigation support from autonomous flying drones

At the ILA Berlin, hall 4, booth 202, Fraunhofer FHR will present two radar sensors for navigation support of drones. The sensors are valuable components in the implementation of autonomous flying drones: they function as obstacle detectors to prevent collisions. Radar sensors also operate reliably in restricted visibility, e.g. in foggy or dusty conditions. Due to their ability to measure distances with high precision, the radar sensors can also be used as altimeters when other sources of information such as barometers or GPS are not available or cannot operate optimally.

Drones play an increasingly important role in the area of logistics and services. Well-known logistic companies place great hope in these compact, aerial...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

International Virtual Reality Conference “IEEE VR 2018” comes to Reutlingen, Germany

08.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Wandering greenhouse gas

16.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

'Frequency combs' ID chemicals within the mid-infrared spectral region

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Biologists unravel another mystery of what makes DNA go 'loopy'

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>