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GSA Session to Address Hurricane Sandy

05.11.2012
GSA Annual Meeting Technical Sessions: Rapid Sea-Level Rise and Its Impacts: Past, Present, and Future I and II
In response to the devastation caused last week by Hurricane Sandy, organizers of the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting technical sessions on rapid sea-level rise and its impacts have created a break-out discussion panel consisting of geoscience experts. The idea is to relate early findings and discuss how the changes caused by Hurricane Sandy to the U.S. East Coast tie into the scientific papers already scheduled for presentation.

Session organizers George T. Stone of Milwaukee Area Technical College, Michael E. Mann of The Pennsylvania State University, Stanley R. Riggs of East Carolina University, and Andrew M. Buddington of Spokane Community College recognized early the need to discuss the effects of Hurricane Sandy. The newly revised discussion panel will follow morning talks in room 219AB of the Charlotte Convention Center on Monday, 5 November.

Five GSA Divisions (GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology; Environmental and Engineering Geology; Geology and Society; Hydrogeology; Sedimentary Geology) and GSA's International Section have teamed up with the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers to bring a multidisciplinary perspective to the problem.
Other talks in this two-part session (morning and afternoon) include "Pulses of rapid sea level rise: Their effect on past, present and future coastal environments and sequences"; Anthropogenic sea-level rise: ethical transgressions; and "Sea-level change during the last 2000 years in southern Connecticut."

Breakout Panel Discussion: Hurricane Sandy and its Impacts
When: Monday, 5 Nov., 11:30 to noon
Where: Charlotte Convention Center, Room 219AB
Session 14: T121. Rapid Sea-Level Rise and Its Impacts: Past, Present, and Future I: https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2012AM/webprogram/Session30943.html

Contacts:
George T. Stone, e-mail: stone@matc.edu
Michael E. Mann, cell: 814-777-3136; e-mail: mann@psu.edu

Representatives of the media and public information officers from universities, government agencies, and research institutions, may participate in technical sessions, field trips, and other special events. Eligible media personnel will receive complimentary registration and are invited to use GSA's newsroom facilities while at the meeting. Journalists and PIOs must pay for any short courses or field trips in which they wish to participate.

For information on media eligibility, go to www.geosociety.org/meetings/2012/media.htm. Media personnel may register onsite in the GSA Newsroom (room 204) at the Charlotte Convention Center. Wireless Internet access and a quiet space for interviews will be provided in the newsroom, along with beverages and light snacks throughout the day.

Find out what else is new and newsworthy by browsing the complete technical program schedule at https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2012AM/finalprogram/.

To identify presentations in specific areas of interest, search topical sessions by discipline categories or sponsors using the drop-down menus at www.geosociety.org/meetings/2012/sessions/topical.asp, or use your browser's "find" feature to search for keywords or convener names.
Newsroom Hours of Operation
• Saturday, 3 Nov., 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
• Sunday, 4 Nov., through Tuesday, 6 Nov., 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
• Wednesday, 7 Nov., 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Newsroom telephone number (incoming calls): +1-704-339-6207 (starting Saturday afternoon).

Contact Christa Stratton, GSA Director of Communications & Marketing, for additional information and assistance.

Christa Stratton | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.geosociety.org/meetings/2012/
http://www.geosociety.org

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