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Global Climate Trend Since Nov. 16, 1978: +0.14 C Per Decade

09.04.2014

Global Temperature Report: March 2014

Global climate trend since Nov. 16, 1978: +0.14 C per decade


UAH

March 2013 Layer = LT Lower Troposphere

March temperatures (preliminary)

Global composite temp.: +0.17 C (about 0.31 degrees Fahrenheit) above 30-year average for March.

Northern Hemisphere: +0.34 C (about 0.61 degrees Fahrenheit) above 30-year average for March.

Southern Hemisphere: ±0.00 C (about 0.00 degrees Fahrenheit) at 30-year average for March.

Tropics: ±0.00 C (about 0.00 degrees Fahrenheit) at 30-year average for March.

February temperatures (revised):

Global Composite: +0.17 C above 30-year average

Northern Hemisphere: +0.32 C above 30-year average

Southern Hemisphere: +0.02 C above 30-year average

Tropics: -0.10 C below 30-year average

(All temperature anomalies are based on a 30-year average (1981-2010) for the month reported.)

Notes on data released April 7, 2014:

March was similar to February, in that warm and cold areas balanced each other in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere, according to Dr. John Christy, a professor of atmospheric science and director of the Earth System Science Center at The University of Alabama in Huntsville. North America was cooler than normal, while Eurasia was warmer. March was the sixth month in a row with below normal temperatures in the lower 48 states.

Compared to seasonal norms, the coldest place in Earth's atmosphere in March was over south central Hudson Bay, where temperatures were as much as 4.87 C (about 8.8 degrees Fahrenheit) cooler than seasonal norms. Compared to seasonal norms, the warmest departure from average in March was along Russia’s northernmost Arctic coast near Faddey Bay. Temperatures there were as much as 4.7 C (8.5 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than seasonal norms.

Archived color maps of local temperature anomalies are available on-line at:

http://nsstc.uah.edu/climate/

As part of an ongoing joint project between UAHuntsville, NOAA and NASA, Christy and Dr. Roy Spencer, an ESSC principal scientist, use data gathered by advanced microwave sounding units on NOAA and NASA satellites to get accurate temperature readings for almost all regions of the Earth. This includes remote desert, ocean and rain forest areas where reliable climate data are not otherwise available.

The satellite-based instruments measure the temperature of the atmosphere from the surface up to an altitude of about eight kilometers above sea level. Once the monthly temperature data is collected and processed, it is placed in a "public" computer file for immediate access by atmospheric scientists in the U.S. and abroad.

Neither Christy nor Spencer receives any research support or funding from oil, coal or industrial companies or organizations, or from any private or special interest groups. All of their climate research funding comes from federal and state grants or contracts.

Dr. John Christy, (256) 961-7763
john.christy@nsstc.uah.edu
Dr. Roy Spencer, (256) 961-7960
roy.spencer@nsstc.uah.edu

Dr. Roy Spencer | newswise

Further reports about: Alabama Climate Earth Fahrenheit Hemisphere Huntsville NASA atmosphere temperature temperatures

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