Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

More than 2 million Euro for Baltic Sea wide Tourism Project AGORA 2.0

05.02.2010
The Institute of Geography and Geology of Greifswald University succeeded to raise financial means of 2,3 mill Euro for the tourism project AGORA 2.0 which deals with common identity of the Baltic Sea Region. The Kick-off Meeting takes place in Greifswald, 11-13 February 2010. Participants come from 10 countries around the Baltic Sea.

The project was approved in the second call of the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007- 2013 (follow-up of the former INTERREG III B Programme). It aims at developing and improving a common identity of the Baltic Sea Region, basing on its rich potentials of natural and cultural heritage. In this concern the term "heritage" is consciously meant in a wider sense, not limited by the extent of UNESCO's world heritage list.

One of the work packages addresses market research to support small and medium sized tourism enterprises. It is intended to enable free access to market data which are well prepared and presented accordingly. Another work package aims at systematical search, structuring and web-based data gathering of identity forming potentials as well as a selection of appropriate data for drafting an identity profile.

Five pilot project groups plan to develop innovative tourism products. The main focus is on concrete cultural and natural treasures of the Baltic Sea Region: castles, red-brick-gothic, forests, shifting sand dunes and stones. In each case partners from 2-4 countries work together, building up on experiences from former projects.

AGORA 2.0 meets the criteria for a sustainable development - therefore it was approved as a Baltic 21 Lighthouse project. It contributes to the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region, especially to the part tourism.

Again, the Institute of Geography and Geology of Greifswald's University takes over the function as a lead partner for a period of 3 years. Just like its forerunner, the project was initiated and developed by Prof. Wilhelm Steingrube. All in all are 24 partners involved in the project.

Part-financed by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund
and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument).
Contact:
Prof. Wilhelm Steingrube and Dipl. oec. Betina Meliss
University of Greifswald
Institute of Geography and Geology
Makarenkostr. 22, 17487 Greifswald, Germany
phone: +49 3834 86-4541
fax: +49 3834 86-4542
agora@uni-greifswald.de

Jan Meßerschmidt | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-greifswald.de
http://www.wisogeo.de

Further reports about: AGORA 2.0 Baltic Sea Baltic Sea Region Geology INTERREG III B Tourism Project

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Scientists shed light on carbon's descent into the deep Earth
19.07.2017 | European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

nachricht Thawing permafrost releases old greenhouse gas
19.07.2017 | GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation

20.07.2017 | Information Technology

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

20.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors

20.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>