Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

‘SciVee’ Science Site Launches the Research Community’s First ‘Postercast’ Capability

28.08.2008
Students and scientists can easily create and upload poster session presentations

SciVee, a Web 2.0 resource dedicated to the dissemination of scientific research and science-specific research networking, is adding an innovative new video feature called a “Postercast” that enables students and professional researchers alike to upload their poster and related video to create a synchronized presentation on the SciVee website. The Postercast is searchable across the web and lets the user participate in a virtual research community to promote broader collaboration than previously possible.

SciVee (http://www.scivee.tv/) has been used by hundreds of thousands of students and professional scientists as a means of learning and sharing their research through “Pubcasts” which supplement peer-reviewed journal articles; communities, which stimulate discussion and collaboration; and science-related videos ranging from popular science to conference keynote lectures.

“SciVee is a very creative example of the potential for cyberinfrastructure, or digital information and communication technologies, to add a powerful new communication and sharing dimension to science,” said Steve Meacham, Senior Science and Technology Advisor for the National Science Foundation’s Office of Cyberinfrastructure.

The SciVee site features an on-line synchronization studio technology that permits researchers or authors to zoom in and highlight specific areas of their posters. This feature allows viewers to see specific sections of the poster as they listen to the video narration so viewers can see specific sections in more detail. The synchronization studio may also be used to sequence a series of slides to appear in concert with the video timeline.

“Posters are the lingua franca for conveying new science, but only appear at a conference for a day or two,” said SciVee co-founder Philip E. Bourne, Distinguished Scientist with SDSC and a professor in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at UCSD. “Postercasts now make that information easily accessible and persistent for a worldwide audience.”

Postercasts take advantage of patent-pending, innovative technology developed by SciVee that links images of text-based media with video presentations. The first Postercasts are already available on the SciVee website in the Experimental Biology 2008 Poster Session Videos community at: http://www.scivee.tv/postercasts.

In addition to researchers gaining exposure for their work through Pubcasts, Postercasts, and science videos, SciVee lets anyone create and join specialized open or private virtual communities that focus on a specific research topic or field of interest to facilitate discussion and networking among members. These communities also provide a forum for members to comment and rate SciVee Pubcasts, Postercasts, and science videos.

“SciVee has been very successful in its goal to build a community around a particular area of research, thereby creating a free flow of ideas across generations as well as different professional levels,” said co-founder Leo M. Chalupa, Distinguished Professor of Ophthalmology and Neurobiology at UC Davis.

In addition, SciVee Postercasts are automatically linked to a member’s professional profile to support the process of career advancement or applications for grants.

About SciVee
SciVee provides community resources for researchers of all levels to share their science, connect with their peers, and respond to scientific data. Researchers can see and hear scientists describe their scientific research, join specific interest communities, participate in scientific discussions, and create a comprehensive multimedia representation of their own research. SciVee was launched in late 2007 as a joint initiative between the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Public Library of Science (PLoS) and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego.
About SDSC
As an organized research unit of UC San Diego, SDSC is a national leader in creating and providing cyberinfrastructure for data-intensive research. Cyberinfrastructure refers to an accessible and integrated network of computer-based resources and expertise, focused on accelerating scientific inquiry and discovery. SDSC is a founding member of the national TeraGrid, which recently reached a combined compute capability equal to one petaflop (10^15 calculations per second).

Jan Zverina | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.sdsc.edu
http://www.scivee.tv/postercasts
http://www.scivee.tv/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht Between filter bubbles, uneven visibility and transnationality
06.12.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>