Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers need more knowledge in intellectual property law

23.08.2010
New doctoral thesis recommends increased awareness of intellectual property issues in the academic world in order to promote future research, says Caroline Pamp, researcher at the Department of Law, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Swedish universities are in the middle of a transformation process where science is privatised and subject to a commercial logic. Hence, a need arises to become more knowledgeable about intellectual property issues, such as patenting, in order to avoid the risk of some research areas disappearing from the universities.

This is one conclusion reached by Caroline Pamp, researcher at the Department of Law, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, in her recently presented thesis on intellectual property and research. One way of responding to this situation could be to provide more mandatory doctoral courses on intellectual property issues.

The thesis Intellectual Property in Science addresses a range of intellectual property issues in early stages of research, with a focus on bioscience and biotechnology. The author, Caroline Pamp from the School of Business, Economics and Law at the University of Gothenburg, refers to the transformation process in the academic world as the ‘privatisation process’. This process is evident not only in the context of commercialisation of research results, but also in research programmes at large. This makes the issue of access to research results highly relevant since the technical development, in combination with increased possibilities to patent early-stage research findings, is making access to research tools increasingly important for the ability of university researchers to conduct continued research.

‘The universities can’t be left without access to research results. As the law is changing, and legal concepts are reinterpreted, the accessibility and openness in the field must be safeguarded though intellectual property contracts,’ says Pamp.

Pamp does not recommend legal change; instead she suggests that the issues be handled through contracts. What she means is that, in response to the new situation at hand, the universities should use strategies based on contracts in order to gain access to patented research results. In return, the university research groups should agree to develop similar contracts for their own research, all for the sake of openness.

Yet, development of effective strategies requires knowledge in intellectual property law, something Pamp says is often lacking in the university world.

‘My ambition is to help researchers become better aware of the new situation they are in and of what they are up against, for example how patenting is relevant to them. I also feel that measures need to be taken to reduce the knowledge gap so that researchers will be able to make informed decisions with respect to these issues. More mandatory doctoral courses on intellectual property would be one way to go’, says Pamp.

For more information, please contact:
Caroline Pamp, telephone: +46 (0)704 33 34 52, caroline.pamp@law.gu.se
The thesis was publicly defended 6 May 2010
Author: Caroline Pamp
Thesis title: Intellectual Property in Science
Department: Department of Law, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/22298
http://www.gu.se

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

“Pregnant” Housefly Males Demonstrate the Evolution of Sex Determination

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>