Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scuppering the pirates improves audio quality

10.08.2007
A new digital watermarking system not only protects music and media files from online pirates but also ensures that the quality for legitimate users is as good as it gets.

Shervin Shirmohammadi Hani Jabbour, and Jiying Zhao of the Discover lab at the University of Ottawa, Canada describe their new approach to beating music pirates today in Inderscience's International Journal of Advanced Media and Communication.

Streaming media and audio files enriches the internet experience for millions of users the world over. However, content creators, such as internet radio stations and podcasters face two major issues in delivering such materials.

The first is ensuring that their high-quality audio content reaches the user's speakers or headphones with high fidelity. The second involves the need to prevent users from duplicating their audio content and either re-selling it or distributing illegally to other users. As high-speed internet access and pervasive computing, such as smart phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs) become more common the opportunities for content pirates grow.

There are several audio watermarking systems available for copyright protection, but according to Shirmohammadi and colleagues few of these also act as quality of service (QoS) monitoring systems.

The advantage of tying together copyright protection and QoS is that the system would have a smaller download footprint than the two alone. The QoS part of the system would allow the end user to choose the quality level for their download depending primarily on the speed of their internet connection or the sound quality of the device they are using. It would also mean that should copyright be broken then the quality of the audio download would suffer, making a pirate copy useless.

The researchers have now developed a copyright-QoS module that can be incorporated into an audio stream transmitted over the Internet. The module provides audio watermarking, copyright protection, data integrity, and authenticity together with QoS monitoring. These can all be fine-tuned for different applications, such as public and private streams, depending on the intended use.

The system involves using a computer algorithm to embed an image within the audio file. The image acts as a digital watermark but does not interfere with the sound. Should there be loss of quality during the download, then the image interpretation component of the audio streaming software on the user's device will alert the user to a problem, providing the QoS aspect of the system.

"The prototype system is transparent," say the researchers," and works ubiquitously on any captured audio." The team has tested its performance and demonstrated the feasibility of real-time audio streaming with QoS and copy protection. The next step will be to extend the work beyond streaming audio to compressed formats, such as the well-known mp3 file, for example.

Jim Corlett | alfa
Further information:
http://www.inderscience.com

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>