Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fertility Doc supports best in film fest

06.03.2007
The world's first CO2 free documentary festival will launch its UK tour at the Barbican on 7 March 2007, with the support of Professor the Lord Robert Winston, acclaimed documentary programme maker, fertility expert and Chancellor of Sheffield Hallam University.

Sheffield DocFest is sponsored by Sheffield Hallam University and will give the best of the Sheffield Documentary Film Festival a national platform. The tour will take in more than ten cities, including Edinburgh, Nottingham, Cardiff and Bradford and will bring six world-class documentaries to a national audience. The fesitval will offset its carbon footprint with the support of Carbon Planet.

One of the highlights of the festival is A Crude Awakening, a documentary that shows how our exploitation of oil has led to fabulous lifestyles, and highlights the ongoing political and economic instability worldwide that this dependence causes. Other documentaries include The Last Days of Yasser Arafat; Dreaming by Numbers; Motodrome; Chances of the World Changing and Every Good Marriage Begins with Tears.

Sheffield Hallam University can boast a number of talented and internationally significant film-makers among its staff and alumni, including Alex Osbourne - Picture Palace North Acid House Trilogy and Tales from a Hard City; Sussanah Gent - Prize winner Berlin for Jelly Dolly; Barry Ryan, Warp Films producer; and Debbie Ballin, producer of Knitting for Annie, for which she received a BAFTA nomination. Also Virginia, Heath whose ‘surf, sex and tattoo’ movie Point Annihilation was screened at the Cannes Film Festival and chosen to help launch Apple’s pioneering USA pilot project in short movie downloads.

Professor the Lord Robert Winston, Chancellor of Sheffield Hallam University, world renowned fertility expert and acclaimed documentary programme maker explains, "I am delighted that this national film festival can boast Sheffield roots, which I think is entirely appropriate considering the wealth of creative film making talent in the region.

"Sheffield Hallam University has a strong tradition in film studies and was the first publicly funded higher education body in the UK to establish a post in film studies, back in 1971.

"The University makes at least 25 films a year and many of these are screened and win awards at prestigious film festivals such as Oberhausen and Chicago, Edinburgh and London International Film Festivals.

"Documentary films allow us to see the world from a different viewpoint, and widen our horizons. Education fulfils a similar role and I am proud that Sheffield Hallam University is associated with DocFest."

Previous DocFests have brought cult information classics to the UK such as Morgan Spurlock's fast food experiment Super Size Me.

Sheffield Hallam University offers a range of courses in film and media production, from foundation degree to postgraduate level. These include film and media production, performing arts and film studies.

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>