Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ECS improves broadcasting options for Virgin Radio

06.04.2005


The School of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS) at the University of Southampton is the first university department to deploy IPv6 in production on its network. Now a team at the School has worked on the technology with Virgin Radio to vastly increase its listening capacity online.



IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) provides 340 undecillion addresses (3.4 x 10Ë38) compared to the four billion addresses possible with the current 20-year-old IPv4. Virgin is the first commercial radio station to use IPv6 in this way, enabling it to reach many more listeners on the Internet.

David Jones, Head of IT at Virgin Radio, said: ’We are delighted to be the first commercial radio station to adopt this next generation Internet protocol, and see it as being essential to the future of Internet Radio. IPv6 is core to the future provision of radio to 3G mobile devices, and will continue our strategy to expand on to all potential platforms.’


Nicholas Humfrey of the School of Electronics and Computer Science deployed the software which enabled Virgin Radio to transmit over the IPv6-capable Internet. He points out that the Internet is running out of space for new addresses and in order to increase its capacity, organisations need to implement IPv6. He comments: ’It’s analogous to when BT had to do lots of renumbering of the telephone system; now the Internet has reached the same stage and needs space for more addresses.’

He added: ’Up to now the take-up of IPv6 has been slow and it has been largely used by research associations rather than end users. We want to see more organisations and Internet Service Providers using it so that we can develop further multicast technologies which will make broadcasting on the Internet a more mutually satisfactory experience.’

Dr Tim Chown, who has led the University’s research work on IPv6 since 1997, said: ’The involvement with Virgin Radio is fantastic, and shows that there is genuine commercial interest in IPv6. This exciting new technology has been made possible by our involvement in the EUR10M 6NET project (see www.6net.org) which has defined and deployed new internet standards for IPv6 multicast.’

Joyce Lewis | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ipv6.ecs.soton.ac.uk/virginradio/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht High Number of Science Enthusiasts in Switzerland
05.02.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht Between filter bubbles, uneven visibility and transnationality
06.12.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>