Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Internet2 may change the way scientists conduct research

06.04.2004


When Dr. Robert Ballard went on a scientific expedition to Black Sea this past summer, he was able to take with him virtually any scientist or student who wanted to go. With the capability of Internet2 and a high bandwidth satellite link, scientists, for the first time, were able to work on the ocean floor from the comfort of their university laboratories.



In the April 6 issue of EOS, the weekly newspaper of the American Geophysical Union, Dr. Ballard, a University of Rhode Island geological oceanographer, describes how Internet2 could change the way scientists conduct deep-sea research.

Internet2 is a consortium of 205 universities working with industry and the government to develop and deploy an advanced Internet network that operates at 10 gigabits per second. "Instead of being restricted to one or two scientists working for a few hours within the small confines of a human-operated vehicle," said Ballard, "scientists using remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs) connected to Internet2 could spend an unlimited about of time on the bottom and share, in real-time, their observations with colleagues around the world."


The technology was put to the test this past summer when Ballard and a team of scientists traveled to the Black Sea for a research expedition sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of Ocean Exploration, and the National Geographic Society.

Ballard explains in the article that two remotely operated vehicles working at or near the bottom of the Black Sea transmitted eight underwater video images and five acoustic signals via fiber optic cable up to the ships command/control center. Six video signals, including two high-definition images and three two-way audio channels, were transmitted off the ship via satellite, were received by an antenna in the US, and placed on Internet2.

The primary Internet2 site for the expedition was the newly created Inner Space Center at the URI Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). Through the use of a series of plasma screens, the Inner Space Center replicates the science workstation aboard the ship. From the Inner Space Center, researchers can talk with the shipboard scientists and technicians and request images at various resolutions for examination.

"The Inner Space Center at GSO is being built to make it possible for GSO scientists and students to participate in various sea-going expeditions sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and NOAA’s Ocean Exploration program from their laboratories at the URI Bay Campus in Narragansett," said Ballard.

During the expedition Internet2 was also used at the Institute for Exploration and Mystic Aquarium to produce live programming for the general public, who were able to ask questions of the team at sea.

"The cost of physically transporting human beings in small numbers to remote regions of the world and then taking them to the bottom of the ocean in even smaller numbers for short periods of time to explore short stretches of the seafloor is clearly not an efficient way to explore the vast regions of our planet," said Ballard.


The URI Graduate School of Oceanography is one of the country’s largest marine science education programs, and one of the world’s foremost marine research institutions. Founded in 1961 in Narragansett, RI, GSO serves a community of scientists who are researching the causes of and solutions to such problems as acid rain, harmful algal blooms, global warming, air and water pollution, oil spills, overfishing, and coastal erosion. GSO is home to the Coastal Institute, the Coastal Resources Center, Rhode Island Sea Grant, the Institute for Archaeological Oceanography, and the National Sea Grant Library.

Lisa Cugini | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uri.edu/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NASA team finds noxious ice cloud on saturn's moon titan

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New procedure enables cultivation of human brain sections in the petri dish

19.10.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>