Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Getting personal with your wearable network

09.03.2004


The digital watch you just bought interacting with your mobile phone? Now a new prototype allows wearable and portable devices communicate with each other via Bluetooth.



The successfully tested 2WEAR prototype is a wearable personal network that links together computing elements in an ad-hoc fashion using short-range radio. Certain elements are embedded into wearable objects, such as a wristwatch and small general-purpose computing and storage modules that can be attached to clothes or placed inside a wallet. Other elements of the system include conventional portable computers, like PDAs and mobile phones.

Stationary elements are also part of the system, including visible components, such as big screens and home appliances, while others are not directly perceivable by the user, such as network gateways and back-end servers. "The system is able to dynamically discover and combine the user interface and storage resources of the devices that are in range with each other," says project manager Spyros Lalis. "We have a couple of demo applications - an alarm application, city-guide application, and a game - that can be used to illustrate this."


The result is a system that brings together various wearable devices without the user having to explicitly provide input to the system. "The latter point is very important for wearable systems that have limited interaction capabilities, but also because it reduces the amount of time the user needs to spend in order to tell the system what to do," Lalis explains.

One example of this is two friends devices automatically exchanging data as they meet, and a camera storing pictures on another device and backing them up to a server, all without bothering the user. Another example is a tourist approaching an information kiosk and using its display to review his walk on a city map and obtain information about the photographed sites as his storage module uploads data via the kiosk’s access point.

"As we speak, the interaction with and combination of the various devices we have around us remains quite cumbersome, and we will have even more personal devices to deal with in the near future. We therefore believe that the concept of 2WEAR will be very relevant for next-generation systems," he says.

How 2WEAR impacts the marketplace of next-generation systems depends, Lalis says, on whether the manufacturers of mobile phones and PDAs decide to adopt a decentralised approach that will allow their devices to be combined with other devices in such a dynamic and flexible way.

Standard radio and higher-level protocols that enable this communication are also needed, which would have to be adopted by all device manufacturers to keep these systems open. "Perhaps the most revolutionary products will come from small companies rather than big players. In technical terms, battery life is currently the most limiting factor for building wearable embedded systems that communicate over radio; but research in batteries, energy scavenging and cheap wireless communication is making progress," he concludes.

Contact:
Spyros Lalis
Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas
Institute of Computer Science
Vassilika Vouton
PO Box 1527
GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete
Greece
Tel: +30-2810-391697
Fax: +30-81-391601
Email: lalis@ics.forth.gr

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/index.cfm?section=news&tpl=article&BrowsingType=Features&ID=62932

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht High Number of Science Enthusiasts in Switzerland
05.02.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht Between filter bubbles, uneven visibility and transnationality
06.12.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

Im Focus: The Future of Ultrafast Solid-State Physics

In an article that appears in the journal “Review of Modern Physics”, researchers at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP) assess the current state of the field of ultrafast physics and consider its implications for future technologies.

Physicists can now control light in both time and space with hitherto unimagined precision. This is particularly true for the ability to generate ultrashort...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Diamond-like carbon is formed differently to what was believed -- machine learning enables development of new model

19.04.2018 | Materials Sciences

Electromagnetic wizardry: Wireless power transfer enhanced by backward signal

19.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Ultrafast electron oscillation and dephasing monitored by attosecond light source

19.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>