Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

With a supercomputer in your pocket

09.02.2004


Draw a picture on the computer and it immediately shows up on the screen of a hand-held computer in Africa. The person with the palm computer can then use the tiny screen to access a supercomputer in France to perform advanced graphic calculations that a number of logged-on people can see simultaneously. This solution is called Verse, a new protocol for 3D graphics created by a 27-year-old with no previous knowledge of programming at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm. Verse was recently demonstrated for the press and public for the first time in Sweden.

Verse replaces troublesome file transfers between graphics programs with real-time communication. For example, two or more architects can simultaneously sit and construct in the same environment from their respective computers, even using different programs. If one of the architects designs a new staircase, it instantly appears on the screens the others are looking at. It can also be used to take advantage of the capacity of another computer via the Internet. For example, with a palm computer out in the forest it would be possible to use, in real time, a supercomputer on the other side of the earth, and have it perform calculations and present the results by means of the Verse protocol. It’s roughly the same principle as having a search engine tap a supercomputer in the U.S. to perform searches.

The principle behind Verse is very general and paves the way for the use of many other graphics programs and contexts where it would be advantageous to work together -games, presentations, visualizations, etc.



Verse is the protocol itself, and KTH, together with the Interactive Institute and several other collaborators, have set up the EU project Uni-Verse, which is headed by KTH. The project has just been granted nearly SEK 18 million from the EU Commission over a three-year period to develop a system for graphics, sound, and acoustics using Verse and making it into a so-called Open Source platform. The Open Source principle has become a highly popular and successful way of developing programs. With an Open Source code, users can program their own versions and improvements and share them via the Internet. The Linux operative system, today one of the world’s leading operative systems, was created using the Open Source principle.

Other partners:

Fraunhofer Institute, Germany; Blender Foundation, Holland; Helsinki University of Technology, Finland; Minus Plus, an architectural firm in Hungary; and Paregos Mediadesign, Stockholm.

The Project, a mega-project in programming, is based on an idea from a single person who had no prior knowledge of programming. Eskil Steenberg, 27 years of age, is the visionary behind the Verse protocol that is the foundation for the EU project Uni-Verse. Eskil Steenberg, who had been active in the graphics and game world, got an idea for a new way to exchange 3D information across different programs. With no programming education and without ever having written any programs previously, he realized his ideas together with the engineer Emil Brink at the Interactive Institute. This astonishing achievement serves as the basis for this EU project. Today both Eskil and Emil work with Project Uni-Verse at KTH.

Ton Roosendaal is chair of the Blender Foundation (www.blender.org) in the Netherlands. Today Blender is one of the biggest 3D tools, with many thousands of users around the world and by far the largest Open Source tool for 3D. Blender’s source code was bought into the public domain by a collection taken up via the Internet, and Ton, alongside Linus Torvalds, is one of the best-known individuals in the Open Source world. Ton has a vision that the next generation of Blender will be based on technology from Project Uni-Verse.

Jacob Seth-Fransson | alfa
Further information:
http://www.vr.se
http://www.blender.org

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Tile Based DASH Streaming for Virtual Reality with HEVC from Fraunhofer HHI
03.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik Heinrich-Hertz-Institut

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New technology offers fast peptide synthesis

28.02.2017 | Life Sciences

WSU research advances energy savings for oil, gas industries

28.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Who can find the fish that makes the best sound?

28.02.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>