Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study shows virtual demonstrations lead consumers to make real purchases

03.09.2003


Seeing really is believing

"Virtual product demonstrations that allow individuals to interact with merchandise create more vivid mental images of the consumer using the products, thereby increasing the likelihood they’ll purchase the item," said Ann Schlosser, UW Business School assistant professor of marketing.

"We’ve found that the more easily individuals can envision themselves using a product, the more likely they are to buy it."



Schlosser studied how consumers’ buying intentions are influenced and affected by their participation in virtual-reality product demonstrations. She found that when users could manipulate products in the virtual world, their likelihood of making a purchase was much higher than when they received this information in a read-only, video or storyboard format.

In her study, participants were asked to spend time at a major manufacturer’s Web site to learn about digital cameras. For those visiting the site with an interactive product demonstration, they could test camera features by pressing the buttons on the camera with their mouse, allowing them to take pictures, preview them, and either save or delete them. According to Schlosser, this simulated virtual interactive product experience increased consumers’ purchase intentions considerably over traditional, non-interactive advertising.

The primary reasons people use the Internet, said Schlosser, are to find useful information and to browse for entertainment. Such motivations have been characterized as ’searching’ versus ’browsing.’ The goal of the research was to examine how individuals process information presented through virtual interactions with a product (object interactivity), and the impact that this has on their buying intentions if they are looking for an aesthetic experience (browsers) or are seeking specific information (searchers).

Schlosser examined how object interactivity affects consumers’ buying intentions even when the user’s goal is merely to browse or search for product information.

Across all experiments performed, object interactivity led to higher buying intentions than when the same information was delivered passively. This finding occurred regardless of whether subjects were searching or merely browsing, or whether they found the site aesthetically appealing.

"Although browsers had more favorable product attitudes after visiting the object-interactive site than searchers did, individuals’ goals for visiting the Web site had no effect on their purchase intentions. After visiting the object-interactive Web site, both browsers and searchers reported that they could clearly envision themselves using the product, which was a significant driver in determining if they intended to buy the product."

Schlosser’s study, "Experiencing Products in the Virtual World: The Role of Goal and Imagery in Influencing Attitudes Versus Purchase Intentions," will be published in the September issue of Journal of Consumer Research.



For more information, contact Schlosser at (206) 685-7497 or aschloss@u.washington.edu.

Nancy Gardner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.washington.edu/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau, study finds

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>