Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study shows virtual demonstrations lead consumers to make real purchases

03.09.2003


Seeing really is believing

"Virtual product demonstrations that allow individuals to interact with merchandise create more vivid mental images of the consumer using the products, thereby increasing the likelihood they’ll purchase the item," said Ann Schlosser, UW Business School assistant professor of marketing.

"We’ve found that the more easily individuals can envision themselves using a product, the more likely they are to buy it."



Schlosser studied how consumers’ buying intentions are influenced and affected by their participation in virtual-reality product demonstrations. She found that when users could manipulate products in the virtual world, their likelihood of making a purchase was much higher than when they received this information in a read-only, video or storyboard format.

In her study, participants were asked to spend time at a major manufacturer’s Web site to learn about digital cameras. For those visiting the site with an interactive product demonstration, they could test camera features by pressing the buttons on the camera with their mouse, allowing them to take pictures, preview them, and either save or delete them. According to Schlosser, this simulated virtual interactive product experience increased consumers’ purchase intentions considerably over traditional, non-interactive advertising.

The primary reasons people use the Internet, said Schlosser, are to find useful information and to browse for entertainment. Such motivations have been characterized as ’searching’ versus ’browsing.’ The goal of the research was to examine how individuals process information presented through virtual interactions with a product (object interactivity), and the impact that this has on their buying intentions if they are looking for an aesthetic experience (browsers) or are seeking specific information (searchers).

Schlosser examined how object interactivity affects consumers’ buying intentions even when the user’s goal is merely to browse or search for product information.

Across all experiments performed, object interactivity led to higher buying intentions than when the same information was delivered passively. This finding occurred regardless of whether subjects were searching or merely browsing, or whether they found the site aesthetically appealing.

"Although browsers had more favorable product attitudes after visiting the object-interactive site than searchers did, individuals’ goals for visiting the Web site had no effect on their purchase intentions. After visiting the object-interactive Web site, both browsers and searchers reported that they could clearly envision themselves using the product, which was a significant driver in determining if they intended to buy the product."

Schlosser’s study, "Experiencing Products in the Virtual World: The Role of Goal and Imagery in Influencing Attitudes Versus Purchase Intentions," will be published in the September issue of Journal of Consumer Research.



For more information, contact Schlosser at (206) 685-7497 or aschloss@u.washington.edu.

Nancy Gardner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.washington.edu/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht Arguments, Emotions, and News distribution in social media - Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus Tübingen
04.05.2018 | Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien

nachricht High Number of Science Enthusiasts in Switzerland
05.02.2018 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

Im Focus: Computer-Designed Customized Regenerative Heart Valves

Cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers from the University of Zurich, the Technical University Eindhoven and the Charité Berlin have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.

Producing living tissue or organs based on human cells is one of the main research fields in regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering, which involves growing...

Im Focus: Light-induced superconductivity under high pressure

A team of scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg investigated optically-induced superconductivity in the alkali-doped fulleride K3C60under high external pressures. This study allowed, on one hand, to uniquely assess the nature of the transient state as a superconducting phase. In addition, it unveiled the possibility to induce superconductivity in K3C60 at temperatures far above the -170 degrees Celsius hypothesized previously, and rather all the way to room temperature. The paper by Cantaluppi et al has been published in Nature Physics.

Unlike ordinary metals, superconductors have the unique capability of transporting electrical currents without any loss. Nowadays, their technological...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heat

18.05.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>