Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

K-State marketing professor studies human relationships with self-service technology

14.04.2003


Although ATMs are convenient, they have taken away from personal interaction during bank transactions. But according to research by a Kansas State University professor, consumers still feel as though they have relational benefits with self-service technology, much as they do when doing business with a human.

The research by Kevin Gwinner, an associate professor of marketing at K-State, shows that the attributes of self-service technology, such as the Internet, kiosks and ATMS, are indirectly linked to a customer’s satisfaction and loyalty. Gwinner completed the research with Rebecca Yen, a professor at Yuan Ze University, Taiwan.

"People think that the Internet and other technology is quick and less complicated," Gwinner said. "We wanted to know what types of relationships were being built when there wasn’t a human to talk with."



Gwinner and Yen’s model showed that although the end result of using self-service technology was customer satisfaction and loyalty, it was indirectly influenced by the benefits that a customer receives, such as added control in the transaction, better performance, convenience of purchasing and efficiency in shopping. Instead, those attributes were found to directly influence the relationship-related benefits the customer receives, including confidence and special treatment.

"Our research verified that relationship benefits still existed even when humans weren’t present on the firm’s side of the transaction," he said. "People believe they will get the same service time and time again when they use technology."

The results of Gwinner and Yen’s empirical study established a model for marketing and business professionals to use to help them better understand their customers’ use of self-service technology.

Gwinner said the findings suggest further research and can be used for academic and business purposes. He also said it would be helpful in business managerial applications to make them aware of how they can design the technological interface with the customer for maximum benefit.

"Additionally, the research can be used in thinking about how to segment markets into groups of consumers with different relationship preferences," he said.

Gwinner and Yen’s research was written during summer 2002 from a survey Yen conducted with 459 master’s of accountancy students in northern Taiwan.

Gwinner and Yen communicated through e-mail to collaborate research and co-author a paper, which was completed in December 2002 and recently accepted for publication. The study will appear in a special issue of the International Journal of Service Industry Marketing on e-commerce topics.

Kevin Gwinner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ksu.edu/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>