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From cell channels to communication channels

26.05.2008
Peter Agre, winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, has been added to the list of speakers at the international Public Communication of Science and Technology (PCST) pre-conference in Sweden in June. He will be present at the two-day PCST pre-conference in Stockholm to discuss science communication with reference to the Nobel Prize.

The PCST pre-conference, held in Stockholm on 23-24 June, will give a Swedish perspective on international science communication. Professor Agre will attend both days of the conference, and will take part in a panel discussion about science communication in general, with reference to the Nobel Prize in particular, with key science journalists from Sweden and abroad.

Key seminars at the pre-conference include:

- Why do we have the Nobel Prize?
- How to select a candidate for the Nobel Prize
- Communication of the Nobel Prizes (from the perspectives of the Royal Swedish Academy, and the prize winners' universities, respectively)
- How to enforce and protect the Nobel Prize trademark
- How the Nobel Prize has changed the communication of science
The PCST pre-conference will also include visits and guided tours of the Nobel Museum and the Stockholm City Hall, where the famous Nobel banquet is held each year.

Following the Stockholm pre-event, the 10th annual PCST conference takes place in Malmö and Lund and Copenhagen in neighbouring Denmark on 25-27 June. The conference will look at how science communication can contribute to sustainable development, and experience how science communication can be made stronger and more effective.

It will bring together some 400 delegates, including science communicators, researchers, science writers, press officers and librarians, from all over the world. Nearly 300 proposals from all parts of the world have been selected for the final programme and some 70 sessions will be taking place during the course of the week.

Speakers at the PCST conference include Diego Golombeck, a scientist from Argentina specialising in science communication, Anja C. Andersen, an astrophysicist at Dark Cosmology Centre at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and Lene Vestergaard Hau, a Danish physicist who will discuss the theme, 'Communicating the unbelievable'.

To register for the PCST international conference, please visit: http://www.pcst-10.org

About Peter Agre:
Peter Agre, Professor of Biological Chemistry and Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, USA, won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 'discoveries concerning channels in cell membranes' and particularly his discovery of water channels. The work contributed towards clarifying how salts (ions) and water are transported out of and into the cells of the body.
Contact:
Madelene Kornfehl
Cloudberry Communications
Tel: +46 (0)8 551 112 11
Mobile: +46 (0)70 658 58 85
Email: madelene@cloudberry.se
Annakarin Svenningsson
Press officer, Swedish Research Council
Tel: +46 (0)8 546 442 19
Mobile: +46 (0)73 355 38 54
Email: anna.karin.svenningsson@vr.se

Annakarin Svenningsson | idw
Further information:
http://www.pcst-10.org
http://www.vr.se

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