Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Irish radar detection research project takes off

13.02.2008
• CTVR aims to commercialise new ‘see through the wall’ technology
• UWB radar systems to potentially be applied in medical & security sectors

The Centre for Telecommunications Value-Chain Research (CTVR) today announced that a research project into ultra-wideband (UWB) radar detection systems being carried by a team at the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) has been backed by Enterprise Ireland.

Ultra-wideband precision radar imaging technology - ‘see-through-the-wall’ radar - can be used in a range of different sectors, from locating persons buried underground in emergency situations, to providing accurate data on patients under ongoing medical supervision, to vehicular anti-collision systems.

The team at the DIT’s Antenna & High Frequency Research Group (AHFR), part of the CTVR’s wider research group, has developed new antenna designs that increase the levels of accuracy of UWB radar systems. In turn, improved accuracy of UWB radar will ultimately allow developers to create applications that can be promoted and marketed commercially.

Professor Donal O’Mahony, Director, CTVR, said: “This research work, which has already been the subject of papers published in some of the world's leading scientific journals, is also hugely significant from a commercial point of view. Our goal from the beginning has been to facilitate the efforts of companies in Ireland to unlock the commercial value of this new technology”.

Dr Max Ammann, Senior Lecturer, Electronic & Communications Engineering, DIT, said: “The support from Enterprise Ireland will allow us to move the project forward, so that our research can move beyond the lab and support the commercialisation of UWB radar systems. At DIT, we have built a strong track record in helping to bring new technologies to the market place, and this is just the latest stage in that process”.

The UWB technology that is being developed may also have extensive application in the communications arena, in terms of allowing laptops to connect wirelessly to office networks, delivering wireless connections between consumer electronics devices or facilitating data streaming from a camcorder to the hard drive of a PC.

The AHFR team at DIT has carried out extensive research in the application of UWB technology for communications purposes. Last year, the team developed new antenna designs to allow for high speed links between communication devices.

In addition, vehicular or automotive radar systems are currently being promoted as another possible use for UWB technology. These systems can potentially be used to improve automotive safety through collision avoidance systems, safer use of airbags, restraint system arming, and parking assistance.

The use of UWB technology in communications systems evolved during the 1980s to meet the needs of US government agencies, especially for communications systems with low intercept and detection probability. Today, interest in UWB devices extends to civilian use.

Penny Storey | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ctvr.ie

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Tile Based DASH Streaming for Virtual Reality with HEVC from Fraunhofer HHI
03.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik Heinrich-Hertz-Institut

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Viruses support photosynthesis in bacteria – an evolutionary advantage?

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers pave the way for ionotronic nanodevices

23.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>