Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


With Fraunhofer IDMT’s spatial acoustics simulation, any room can be turned into a concert hall

Whether it’s in movie theaters or at home, at concerts or at conferences, in clubs or in planetariums – the trend towards 3D audio systems and applications is definitely gaining momentum.

Being among the world’s leading research institutes in the field of spatial acoustics, Fraunhofer IDMT has now added a new feature to its “SpatialSound Wave“ 3D sound system: interactive room simulation technology allows true-to-life sound reproduction in any room.

SpatialSound Wave, the sound and production system developed by Fraunhofer IDMT, allows consistent reproduction of sound objects and acoustic environments, so that the audience can fully immerse themselves in the sound. By empowering SpatialSound Wave to reproduce any room characteristics, Fraunhofer IDMT’s acousticians have created a whole new quality in true-to-life room acoustics simulation.

Interactive spatial acoustics simulation to provide optimal room acoustics

Taking advantage of dynamic room simulation, acoustic characteristics of both virtual and real rooms can be simulated, allowing to achieve excellent 3D sound of music performances and optimal room acoustics. Acoustics produced can be adapted to the requirements and ambient conditions of any event, in order to make for, for example, improved voice sound quality at conferences or optimal sound during concerts. “As we are able to interactively adjust reverberation time, we can manipulate any room acoustics and adapt it to the position and movement of sound sources. For example, when a singer is moving on stage, the audience usually will notice a change in the acoustics they perceice. We are now able to manipulate room acoustics so that any listener, regardless of where they are seated, can enjoy a consistent, true-to-life sound“, says René Rodigast, head of Professional Audio group at Fraunhofer IDMT. “Apart from that, we are able to switch between several simulated rooms in real-time, allowing listeners to get different sound impressions by the push of a button, like, for example, a concert hall, a cathedral, or a football stadium“, Mr Rodigast adds.

Spatial acoustics for multiple purposes

SpatialSound Wave is based on Fraunhofer IDMT’s many years of experience with spatial audio reproduction technology, such as wave field synthesis. SpatialSound Wave comes as a compact spatial sound reproduction system that does not require a closed-loop loudspeaker setup in order to provide great true-to-life sound immersion. The system can be used as a fixed or a mobile installation for conferences, clubs, concerts, events, as well as in planetariums or theme parks.

SpatialSound Wave at Prolight + Sound 2013, Frankfurt

Visitors of the Prolight + Sound trade fair, taking place April 10 – 13 in Frankfurt, are invited to stop by at the booth of Fraunhofer IDMT (Hall 8, E 37) to witness live demos and get to know the latest on interactive room simulation.

Fraunhofer IDMT will also be contributing to the Media Systems Congress at Prolight + Sound, giving a presentation entitled “Speech Reproduction and Concert Acoustics: Spatial Acoustics Simulation in 3D Sound Engineering“, in the course of which attendees will be learning about the technology and what purposes it can be used for.

Speaker: René Rodigast
Date: April 12, 2013, 11 a.m.
Place: Herstellerforum, Media Systems Congress
Media representatives are cordially invited to attend the presentation.
About Fraunhofer IDMT
The Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT is doing applied research in the field of audiovisual media. The Institute is known as a competent partner of industry when it comes to developing groundbreaking technologies for the digital media domain. Together with its contracting partners Fraunhofer IDMT develops cutting-edge solutions consistently designed to meet user requirements and expectations. At its headquarters in Ilmenau and its branches in Erfurt and Oldenburg Fraunhofer IDMT employs over one-hundred people working on the Institute’s research portfolio.

Press and Public Relations

Stefanie Miethbauer
Phone +49 3677 467-331

Katrin Pursche | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:

Further reports about: Acoustics IDMT SpatialSound Wave simulation technology

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht Product placement: Only brands placed very prominently benefit from 3D technology
07.07.2016 | Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt

nachricht NASA Goddard network maintains communications from space to ground
02.03.2016 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

A new look at thyroid diseases

28.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Sweetening neurotransmitter receptors and other neuronal proteins

28.10.2016 | Life Sciences

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>