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DFG Science TV to be Continued

19.01.2009
Shorts now also online in English

DFG Science TV, the online television channel provided by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation), is to be continued following its successful launch last year.

In 2009, once again, scientists and researchers will take to the camera themselves to document and explain the work they do. This will also see a further expansion of the concept of filmed research diaries, which is so far unique in Germany.

With Science TV, the DFG has beaten a new track in the communication of science in light of the changing user habits, primarily among the younger generation and the increasing importance of video on Internet platform.

“The pilot phase of DFG Science TV has shown that the films are a great success with our audience”, said Professor Matthias Kleiner, President of the DFG. “Most of all, we want to spark young people’s enthusiasm for science. They are increasingly using the Internet as their source of information, so science also needs to be adequately represented there. DFG Science TV allows them to take a look over the scientists’ and researchers’ shoulders as they work and thus be grabbed by the fascinating world of research.”

DFG Science TV presents exceptional research projects on the Internet using video shorts. The special thing about this is that the films are actually filmed by the scientists and researchers involved in the projects themselves, after being given training by professional camera operators. The raw film footage is then compressed into three-minute shorts by a professional production company and then put online.

In the next few weeks, ten new research projects from a wide variety of research areas – anything from archaeology to zoology is possible – will be selected for the continuation of the DFG’s Internet TV project. The first films are expected to go online in May. Because of the great interest shown by scientists and researchers in participating in DFG Science TV in recent months, there will be a competition to select the projects this time.

Science TV has also become international and more user-friendly. The films from the pilot phase are now also available in English, in line with the international nature of the research funded by the DFG. The new series of films and the new, expanded Internet portal will be bilingual right from the start. Also, a number of additional interactive functions will be added to the existing Internet platform to better cater for the needs of many users of the site. For example, it will be possible to download the new film shorts, and users will be able to subscribe to the site's RSS feed so that they are notified of updates.

Apart from the main target audience, which is young Internet users, the shorts on DFG Science TV also make it possible for teachers, media experts and everyone interested in science to get a first-hand glimpse of the world of research.

Further information

You find the English version of DFG Science TV on the website
www.dfg-science-tv.com.
The terms and conditions for the application of scientific projects are available (in German only) for download from www.dfg.de/aktuelles_presse/information_fuer_die_wissenschaft/

andere_verfahren/info_wissenschaft_05_09.html

Jutta Hoehn | alfa
Further information:
http://www.dfg.de
http://www.dfg-science-tv.com

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