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ThruVision wins Grand Security Product Award 2008

20.11.2008
ThruVision’s non-invasive security screening system wins ‘Best of what’s new 2008’ security award

An innovative security screening system from ThruVision, that can detect hidden explosives, liquids, narcotics, weapons, plastics and ceramics from a distance, has received the grand security product award in the ‘Best of what’s new 2008’ by the US Magazine ‘Popular Science’.

Called the T5000, the system forms images of metallic and non-metallic threat or contraband objects concealed under clothing out to distances of 25m. It was developed by UK security equipment manufacturer ThruVision Ltd, a spin out company of the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

Like all ThruVision products, the T5000 was developed to address personal privacy concerns now being raised in connection with the use of security imaging technologies. The T5000 avoids many of the acceptability issues associated with the use of imaging technologies in the public domain by non-intrusively detecting a wide range of contraband objects such as weapons, explosives, liquids and narcotics on walking or stationary people at various distances. Importantly the T5000 does this without revealing anatomical detail, thereby preserving the privacy of the subject. Concealed objects are shown against a silhouette of the human form.

The T5000 is also safe; it forms images of concealed objects by receiving natural low energy waves produced by people and their surroundings. Unlike an X-ray camera, the T5000 does not emit dangerous ionizing radiation so there is no threat to the operators or people being screened.

Clive Beattie, ThruVision CEO, said “We are very pleased and honoured to have received this award from Popular Science. The recent European Parliamentary decision to further study the health and human rights implications of full body scanners before their deployment in EU airports highlights the importance of all our products’ safety and privacy-related attributes. The ability to non-invasively screen for concealed objects at a distance offers a significant advantage to security system operators for applications including border and access control, counter-terrorism and asset protection.”

ThruVision’s passive imaging technology originally stems from research carried out at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to study dying stars. Dr Liz Towns Andrews, Director of Knowledge Exchange at STFC said: “This award is well-deserved recognition for ThruVision. STFC is totally committed to using its research facilities and scientific expertise to support and develop such innovative enterprises, so I’d like to congratulate ThruVision on this achievement.”

Wendy Taylor MCIPR | alfa
Further information:
http://www.dl.ac.uk

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