Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Thomas Wollert receives Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators

20.04.2015

With the Eppendorf Young Investigator Award, the Eppendorf AG honors outstanding work in biomedical research in collaboration with the scientific journal Nature.

Thomas Wollert, group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, was selected by an independent Award Jury for his groundbreaking studies to reveal how fundamental cellular transport processes are coordinated at a molecular level.


The biochemist receives the 20,000 Euro prize for identifying mechanisms that drive intracellular recycling pathways. The official award ceremony with representatives from science, economy, and media will take place at the EMBL Advanced Training Centre in Heidelberg, Germany, on June 25, 2015.

How do cells get rid of their waste?

The cells of our body face similar challenges as we do: without efficient waste disposal systems heaps of trash will accumulate over time. Human cells therefore rely on specific mechanisms to pick up cellular waste such as superfluous or damaged organelles and to deliver them to recycling facilities. Diminished performance of this cellular recycling system may cause severe disorders including Alzheimer´s disease or cancer.

The research of Thomas Wollert and his team focuses on autophagy, which represents an important recycling system of the cell. During autophagy, cellular waste is captured and subsequently delivered to specialized recycling facilities, called lysosomes. Thus, autophagy protects the cell from accumulating cell debris.

“The Eppendorf-Award honors our efforts to understand cellular transport mechanisms at a molecular scale,” says Thomas Wollert, group leader at the MPI of Biochemistry since 2010. “Our findings might provide the basis for the development of new therapies against cancer or neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer.”

With the Eppendorf Young Investigator Award, which was established in 1995, the Eppendorf AG honors in partnership with the scientific journal Nature outstanding work in biomedical research to support young scientists in Europe up to on age of 35.

The Award winner is selected by an independent committee composed of chairman Prof. Reinhard Jahn (Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen, Germany), Prof. Dieter Häussinger (Clinic for Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectiology, Düsseldorf, Germany), Prof. Maria Leptin (EMBO, Heidelberg, Germany), and Prof. Martin J. Lohse (Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Würzburg, Germany). The award is endowed with 20,000 €.

Contact
Dr. Thomas Wollert
Molecular Membrane and Organelle Biology
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Am Klopferspitz 18
82152 Martinsried
Germany
Email: wollert@biochem.mpg.de
www.biochem.mpg.de/wollert

Anja Konschak
Public Relations
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Am Klopferspitz 18
82152 Martinsried
Germany
Tel. +49 89 8578-2824
E-Mail: konschak@biochem.mpg.de
www.biochem.mpg.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.biochem.mpg.de/4979496/20150420_wollert_eppendorf - Press Release and Further Information
http://www.biochem.mpg.de/en/rg/wollert - Research Group "Molecular Membrane and Organelle Biology" (Dr. Thomas Wollert)

Anja Konschak | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht BMBF funds translational project to improve radiotherapy
10.05.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Photography: An unusual and surprising picture of science
04.05.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>