Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Karen Beemon wins the 2007 Retrovirology Prize

11.12.2007
It was announced today that Dr Karen Beemon has been awarded the third annual Retrovirology Prize. Dr Beemon will receive a $3000 cheque and a crystal trophy and is interviewed in an article published today in the open access journal Retrovirology. She is Professor and Chair of the Biology Department, Johns Hopkins University.

“I am very honored to receive the 2007 Retrovirology Prize. It is wonderful to be recognized by the Retrovirology community. It is gratifying that this prize was awarded for basic research with chicken retroviruses. I became fascinated with these viruses as a graduate student and have studied them ever since. I am amazed at how complex and elegant the simple retroviruses actually are and how much they have taught us about viral gene expression and mechanisms of oncogenesis. I am indebted to my mentors, students, and collaborators, who contributed to this research.”

The Retrovirology Prize, awarded annually, recognises an outstanding mid-career retrovirologist aged 45 to 60. The prize, supported by the Ming K. Jeang Foundation, alternates between HIV and non-HIV research. Last year’s winner was Dr Joe Sodroski, Professor of Pathology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School and Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health.

The M Jeang Retrovirology Prize winner is selected, by Retrovirology’s Editors, from nominations submitted by the journal’s Editorial Board. Representing the Editors of Retrovirology, Kuan-Teh Jeang explained why they awarded Dr Beemon with the Retrovirology prize. “Professor Beemon has made tremendous contributions to our understanding of how retroviruses transform cells. She was instrumental in establishing that one of the important transformation mechanisms is the aberrant phosphorylation of cellular proteins on tyrosine residues.”

Dr Beemon received her PhD in 1974 from the University of California. She was a postdoctoral fellow there and also at the Salk institute. She was among the first to develop and apply molecular techniques to characterise the genomes of RNA viruses, describe recombination between viral genomes, characterise sarcoma-specific sequences, and perform structure-function analysis of src proteins. Of particular importance, was her discovery that transformation mechanisms of multiple classes of retroviruses involve aberrant phosphorylation of cellular proteins at tyrosine residues. Over the last two decades, Dr. Beemon has contributed significantly to the scientific community’s understanding of the role of cis-acting regulatory elements in regulation of RNA splicing, polyadenylation, nuclear export and nonsense-mediated RNA decay.

Dr. Beemon’s honors in research recognition include the Faculty Research Award from the American Cancer Society and the Fogarty Senior International Fellowship. She has published nearly 80 peer-reviewed manuscripts and review articles in journals ranked in the top of their subject field (e.g. Cell, PNAS, Journal of Virology, Molecular Cellular Biology, Oncogene, RNA). This year she was appointed a senior editor of the Journal of Virology.

Charlotte Webber | alfa
Further information:
http://www.retrovirology.com/content/4/1/88

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht BMBF funding for diabetes research on pancreas chip
08.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann
20.01.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>