Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

BBVA Chairman Francisco González announces the BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Awards

10.12.2007
Francisco González, chairman of BBVA, today presented the “BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Awards”. The prize money in these new BBVA Foundation Awards (an annual 3.2 million euros) and the breadth of scientific and artistic disciplines addressed place them among the world’s major awards, second only to the Nobel Prize.

In his presentation speech, Francisco González affirmed that “these awards will honor excellence in research and artistic creation, with an accent on forward-looking projects that address the major challenges confronting the global society of the 21st century”.

“We also wish to activate society’s latent regard for the work of the scientific community”, the BBVA Chairman continued, “and believe the ‘BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Awards’ are an effective means to do so”.

“In sum”, he concluded, “the awards we are launching here will stand as a new international benchmark, as well as marking a qualitative leap in BBVA’s support for knowledge and innovation”.

The BBVA Chairman also remarked in this speech that “our engagement with society, our vision of corporate social responsibility have led us to devote growing resources – both human and financial – to the generation and spread of knowledge; this philosophy of the BBVA Group and its foundations, both in Spain and Latin America, is what lies behind initiatives like these Awards, which will stand as a benchmark for scientists and creative practitioners, while providing recognition and encouragement to the many people and teams all round the world who are working, like BBVA, to achieve a better future for humanity”.

The BBVA Foundation chairman was joined at the event by Carlos Martínez, president of Spain’s principal public research organization, the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, which will collaborate in the appointment of technical evaluation committees and propose the chairs of the prize juries.

THE AWARDS

The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Awards seek to recognize and encourage research and artistic creation, prizing contributions of lasting impact for their originality, theoretical and conceptual implications and, where appropriate, their translation to innovative practices of a salient nature.

The name of the scheme is intended to encapsulate both research work that successfully enlarges the scope of our current knowledge, continually pushing forward the frontiers of the known world, and the meeting of different disciplinary areas. Oriented to the branches of knowledge that most characterize the 21st century, the BBVA Foundation Awards wish to recognize the emergence of new knowledge areas, along with the interdisciplinary nature of scientific research and the fact that many seminal contributions to our current stock of knowledge are the result of collaborative working between large and frequently multinational research teams.

AWARD CATEGORIES

These awards will honor disciplinary or interdisciplinary advances in a series of basic, natural, social and technological sciences, along with creative activity of excellence in the arts. Categories are also reserved for two core concerns of early 21st century society, namely climate change and development cooperation, with awards going alternatively to outstanding research work or projects that mark a significant advance in addressing these global challenges.

The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Awards, to be given annually, take in the following categories:

- Basic Sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics)
- Biomedicine
- Ecology and Conservation Biology
- Information and Communication Technology
- Economics, Finance and Business Management
- Arts (Music, Painting, Sculpture, Architecture)
- Climate Change
- Development Cooperation
PRIZE MONEY
The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Awards come with a monetary award of 400,000 euros in each prize category. This is higher than both the global and individual amounts per category of such prestigious international schemes as the Kyoto, Wolf, Kavli or Japan prizes:
Nobel Prize (annual): 6 million euros with 1 million per category
BBVA Foundation Awards (annual): 3.2 million euros with 400,000 per category
Kavli Prize (biennial): 2.1 million euros with 700,000 per category
Kyoto Prize (annual): 900,000 euros with 300,000 per category
Japan Prize (annual): 600,000 euros with 300,000 per category
Wolf Prize (annual): 407,280 euros with 67,880 per category
PURPOSE OF THE AWARDS
The scientific community receives little in the way of explicit or symbolic recognition, despite the fact that scientists number among the professional groups most highly valued by society. The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Awards aim to activate this latent regard on the part of society for scientists and their work.

The Foundation’s desire to publicly recognize the efforts of researchers, organizations and professionals working to improve the societies where they operate has found previous expression in the BBVA Foundation Awards for Biodiversity Conservation, which will be incorporated within the Frontiers of Knowledge scheme following the conclusion of their third edition, the Giner de los Ríos Awards for the Improvement of Educational Quality – organized jointly with the Spanish Ministry for Education and Science since 1983 – and the Economics for Management Lecture Series award of the BBVA Foundation and IESE.

In this respect, the BBVA Foundation expresses the engagement of BBVA with the cause of social responsibility in the societies where it does business, placing knowledge and innovation at the service of a better quality of life for citizens.

CANDIDATES AND NOMINATIONS

Candidates for the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Awards may be one or more natural persons, without limit of number, of any nationality, i.e., recognition can go to achievements resulting from cooperation between different teams. In the categories of Climate Change and Development Cooperation, entries are also open to public or private not-for-profit organizations.

Nominations are invited from any of the following institutions: scientific or artistic societies and organizations; national or regional academies of the sciences or the arts; public or private R&D centers; university departments and university or research institutes; conservatories and schools of music; museums of the arts and sciences; and public agencies and other organizations substantially engaged in analysis and/or activities relating to climate change and development cooperation.

Entries can be submitted from January 2, 2008 to June 30, 2008 using the form provided on the dedicated website: www.fbbva.es/awards.

Candidate selection will be guided by the principles of objectivity and independence and will rely on the best standards and metrics of excellence in each prize area. The Foundation will be partnered in the selection process by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Spain’s premier multidisciplinary research organization. As well as collaborating with the appointment of evaluation committees, the CSIC will propose the chair of each prize jury, to be made up eminent international specialists.

Javier Fernández | alfa
Further information:
http://www.fbbva.es

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Scientist at Kiel University receive EU funding to develop new implantats
22.11.2017 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

nachricht Tracking down the origins of gold
08.11.2017 | Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien gGmbH

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New proton record: Researchers measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision

High-precision measurement of the g-factor eleven times more precise than before / Results indicate a strong similarity between protons and antiprotons

The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this measurement was laid over ten...

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

IceCube experiment finds Earth can block high-energy particles from nuclear reactions

24.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 'half-hearted' solution to one-sided heart failure

24.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heidelberg Researchers Study Unique Underwater Stalactites

24.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>