Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New method for successful bone tissue engineering wins Kaye Award for Hebrew U. researcher

23.06.2008
A new and better method for accelerating bone formation in cases of orthopedic injuries and conditions, such as osteoporosis, fractures and disc disorders, has been developed by Nadav Kimelman at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Dental Medicine.

The method involves increasing oxygen availability in scaffolds in order to accelerate bone formation. The lack of such oxygen supply constitutes a serious impairment to successful tissue engineering.

For his work, Kimelman, who is a doctoral student under Prof. Dan Gazit, was chosen as one of the winners of a Kaye Innovation Award, which was presented on June 4 during the Hebrew University's 71st meeting of the Board of Governors.

The term 'tissue engineering' describes the development of biological replacements for damaged tissues or organs. Biological replacements could act as a solution for the shortage in organ donations and also serve as efficient substitutes for synthetic implants that usually fail in the long run.

For successful engineering of an organ or tissue, the appropriate cells, biological cues and a three-dimensional scaffold should be combined. This is also the case for bone tissue engineering in which cells, genes and scaffolds are combined to heal complex fractures that cannot be repaired otherwise.

One of the major hurdles in successful tissue engineering, however, is the lack of oxygen supply to the newly forming tissue – resulting in cell death and less efficient tissue formation.

Kimelman decided to overcome this fundamental hurdle by utilizing synthetic oxygen carriers as a way to increase oxygen availability in scaffolds. To validate their approach, they combined adult stem cells, programmed to generate bone tissue formation, with injectable scaffolds (hydrogels) containing synthetic oxygen carriers. They then tested the survival of the cells and the amount of bone that was generated.

The results demonstrated significant elevated bone formation and cell survival in the hydrogels supplemented with synthetic oxygen carriers compared to the control groups. They even found that the addition of oxygen carriers also led to more rapid bone formation than the controls.

His results show, for the first time, that synthetic oxygen carriers supplementation enhances and accelerates engineered bone formation, which he believes is achieved by elevating cell survival.

According to Kimelman, however, the results could pave the way for novel therapeutic strategies not only in orthopedics, but also in other medical applications such as cardiology and neurosurgery.

The Kaye Innovation Awards have been given annually since 1994. Isaac Kaye of England, a prominent industrialist in the pharmaceutical industry, established the awards to encourage faculty, staff and students of the Hebrew University to develop innovative methods and inventions with good commercial potential which would benefit the university and society.

For further information, contact:

Rebecca Zeffert, Dept. of Media Relations, the Hebrew University, tel: 02-588-1641, cell: 054-882-0661

or Orit Sulitzeanu, Hebrew University spokesperson, tel: 02-5882910, cell: 054-882-0016.

Rebecca Zeffert | The Hebrew University of Jerusal
Further information:
http://media.huji.ac.il
http://www.huji.ac.il

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Otto Hahn Medal for Jaime Agudo-Canalejo
21.06.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kolloid- und Grenzflächenforschung

nachricht Call for nominations of outstanding catalysis researchers for the Otto Roelen Medal 2018
20.06.2017 | DECHEMA Gesellschaft für Chemische Technik und Biotechnologie e.V.

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>