Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Professor Immanuel Bloch receives Senior BEC Award 2013

09.08.2013
The Scientific and Award Committees of the Bose–Einstein Conference Series honours Prof. Immanuel Bloch, Director at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics and Professor for Experimental Physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, with the Senior BEC Award 2013.

Prof. Bloch will receive this prize for “his pioneering experimental contributions to the field of quantum many‐body physics with cold atoms in optical lattices”. Since the discovery of Bose-Einstein condensates – a very special, exotic form of matter – in 1995, BEC Conferences take place biannually at different locations.

“BEC conferences are the highlight of the meetings concerning the physics of ultracold atoms, as almost all top groups carrying out research in this field are participating,” Prof. Bloch says. The International Senior & Junior BEC awards have been established two years ago. This year’s winner of the Junior BEC Award is Prof. Markus Greiner (Harvard University), who was affiliated with the MPQ in the early years of his career. (Photo: Hector Stiftung).

The existence of a so-called Bose-Einstein condensate has been predicted by Albert Einstein and Satyendra Nath Bose about 90 years ago, describing the statistics of a gas of identical quantum particles that are characterized by their integer spin. Below an extremely low critical temperature these particles go all at once into the lowest possible quantum state, forming a “condensate” in which the waves of the individual particles merge into one single matter wave of almost macroscopic dimensions – about 100 micrometres. BECs have been brought into reality in 1995 for the first time, almost parallel by two different research groups in the USA – a discovery, for which Eric Cornell, Wolfgang Ketterle and Carl Wiemann were given the Nobel prize in Physics in 2001.

“Today, BECs serve as a starting point for the generation of new forms of matter,” Prof. Bloch explains. And for quite some years by now physicists around the world have been experimenting not only with the (comparatively) easy to handle bosons, but also with fermions – particles that are never allowed to occupy the identical quantum state what makes them harder to tame.

The special topic of Prof. Bloch is the investigation of ultracold quantum gases in crystals of light generated by laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In 2001, by choosing a special set of lattice parameters, Bloch succeeded in transforming a BEC – in which the particles can move around freely like in a suprafluid – into a state in which each atom is fixed to its lattice site, a so-called Mott insulator. Meanwhile Bloch and his group are able to produce direct images of the single atoms, as well as to address and to manipulate them. These quantum many-body systems are therefore ideally suited for modelling solid state systems, helping to understand phenomena such as superconductivity. Furthermore, the high control over the single particles opens the perspective of using them as quantum bits in a future quantum computer.

Immanuel Bloch has been awarded with several highly renowned scientific awards. Twice he has won the Philip Morris Research prize (in 2000, together with Prof. Hänsch, and in 2007). In 2002 he has received the Otto Hahn Medal of the Max Planck Society, in 2005 the Gottfried-Wilhelm-Leibniz prize of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), the German National Merit Medal, and the International Commission of Optics Prize. In 2011 the European Physical Society (EPS) has given to him the “2011 Prize for Fundamental Aspects of Quantum Electronics and Optics”, and only this year he has been awarded with the Hector Science Prize 2012 and the Körber Award. The BEC award will be presented to him at the Bose–Einstein Conference in Sant Feliu, Spain, 7–13 September 2013. Olivia Meyer-Streng

Information on the person:
Immanuel Bloch, born in 1972, began his studies in physics at the Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in Bonn where he received his diploma in 1996. After having spent one year of research at Stanford University he joined the Laser Spectroscopy Division of Professor Theodor W. Hänsch (MPQ and LMU). In 2000 he obtained his doctoral degree from the LMU. He continued his research in the Hänsch group until he became appointed as Professor at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. Since 2008 he has been Director at the MPQ and leader of the Quantum Many-Body Systems Division, and since 2009 Chair of Quantum Optics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich.
Contact:
Prof. Dr. Immanuel Bloch
Chair of Experimental Physics, LMU Munich, Schellingstr. 4
80799 München, Germany, and
Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics
Phone: +49 (0)89 32905 -138
Fax: +49 (0)89 32905 -760
E-mail: immanuel.bloch@mpq.mpg.de

Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng | Max-Planck-Institut
Further information:
http://www.quantum-munich.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht The quest for the oldest ice on Earth
14.11.2016 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht Empa Innovation Award for new flame retardant
09.11.2016 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact, High Frequency DC/DC Converter for Aviation

The efficiency of power electronic systems is not solely dependent on electrical efficiency but also on weight, for example, in mobile systems. When the weight of relevant components and devices in airplanes, for instance, is reduced, fuel savings can be achieved and correspondingly greenhouse gas emissions decreased. New materials and components based on gallium nitride (GaN) can help to reduce weight and increase the efficiency. With these new materials, power electronic switches can be operated at higher switching frequency, resulting in higher power density and lower material costs.

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE together with partners have investigated how these materials can be used to make power...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

02.12.2016 | Medical Engineering

Plasma-zapping process could yield trans fat-free soybean oil product

02.12.2016 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

What do Netflix, Google and planetary systems have in common?

02.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>