Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pioneering climate researcher: Schellnhuber receives highest-ranking awards

08.09.2011
For his world-leading contributions to Earth system science and for the transfer of scientific insight into policy, Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), will this autumn receive several awards.

The Volvo Prize, considered to be the highest-ranking distinction for environmental research, will be presented to Schellnhuber in early November in Sweden. The President of Germany will bestow upon him the Federal Order of Merit, first class, in October in Berlin’s Bellevue Palace. And the renowned University of Copenhagen will honour him with an Honorary Doctorate.

"In the creation of diverse, interdisciplinary research that can take on the most frightening climate challenges facing humanity, there is no one better than Hans Joachim Schellnhuber to contribute with international leadership in the development and application of scientific findings for politicians and decision-makers," the Volvo-Prize Jury statement says. As a physicist, Schellnhuber “has applied the rigorous, quantitative background to Earth System science,” thereby setting the stage for the development of this strand of research. He is the first German to receive the prize.

"The Volvo Prize in fact is something like the Nobel prize for environmental sciences, since unfortunately up till now there is no Nobel Prize for this kind of interdisciplinary approach," says Paul Crutzen, Nobel Prize Laureate for chemistry. Before winning this in 1995 for his research on ozone layer depletion, Crutzen had himself been one of the very first recipients of the Volvo Prize. "It is more than well deserved that Hans Joachim Schellnhuber now receives this eminent award. He is a researcher who has changed the way we look at all the complex processes between heaven and earth. But he is more than just a brilliant brain - he is a brain with a conscience. Schellnhuber is incessantly building bridges between science and society, like hardly anyone else does."

Schellnhuber’s interest in complex systems and nonlinear dynamics, often called chaos theory, led him from fundamental physical research to climate science. He developed several iconic concepts, for instance the analysis of “tipping elements” in the climate system, that have given impulses to international research. The two-degree-target for limiting climate change – which later on got taken up by policy-makers worldwide – was conceived under the leadership of Schellnhuber by the German Advisory Council on Global Change (WBGU). Schellnhuber has published more than 250 scientific articles and over 50 books or book chapters. He is, amongst other things, a member of the American National Academy of Sciences and the German Academy of Sciences (Leopoldina) as well as a professor at the University of Potsdam, Germany, and the influential Santa Fe Institute in the US.

It is on this basis that Schellnhuber became an important interlocutor of policy-makers: in the WBGU that he is a member of since 1992; in the experts team of EU Commission President José Manuel Barroso; as the chief advisor on climate issues for chancellor Angela Merkel during the German presidency of G8 and EU Council in 2007; or for the state government of Brandenburg.

The prize is funded by Volvo but awarded by an independent foundation.The Jury of the Volvo Prize consists of Gita Sen, professor at the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore and Jacqueline McGlade, executive director of the European Environment Agency, and others. The prize has previously gone to figures like Susan Solomon from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the US or Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Muhammad Yunus from Bangladesh. The award comes with a cash sum of about 160,000 Euro.

The official statements on the Federal Order of Merit and on the Honorary Doctorate of the University of Copenhagen will be published later this year.

Pictures are available upon request

For further information please contact the PIK press office:

Phone: +49 331 288 25 07
E-mail: press@pik-potsdam.de

Jonas Viering | idw
Further information:
http://www.pik-potsdam.de
http://www.environment-prize.com/component/option,com_frontpage/Itemid,1/
http://www.pik-potsdam.de/members/john/shortbio/shortbio?set_language=en

Further reports about: Earth's magnetic field German language Nobel Prize PIK Science TV Volvo WBGU

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Lasagni awarded with Materials Science and Technology Prize 2017
09.10.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS

nachricht Eduard Arzt receives highest award from German Materials Society
21.09.2017 | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>