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Ph.D. Fellowships: Call for applications!

21.06.2010
The newly launched “International Max Planck Research School for Global Biogeochemical Cycles” located in Jena, Germany, accepts applications for Ph.D. fellowships until August 10, 2010.

The Research School offers a three-year graduate program in global biogeochemistry and related Earth system sciences with a special teaching program consisting of lectures, seminars and a three month external research visit.

The key elements to life such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are continuously exchanged among land, ocean and atmosphere, processes known as global biogeochemical cycles. Research activities in the IMPRS are aimed at a fundamental understanding of these cycles, how they are interconnected, and how they can change with climate or human activity. Students will participate in ongoing research comprising field observations, method development, experiments, and numerical modeling. The students will have further opportunities to acquire valuable knowledge and abilities for their future scientific career.

Applications from highly qualified and well-motivated students from all countries will be considered; prerequisite is a diploma or master of science degree in geophysical sciences, environmental sciences, biological sciences, physics, chemistry, computer sciences or related fields, including a corres-ponding thesis. Very good communication skills in English are mandatory.

Successful candidates will be offered a highly communicative scientific environment, a comprehensive mentoring program as well as a Ph.D. stipend for three years. The studies will start in October 2010.

The application procedure starts with an online registration on the IMPRS homepage: http://www.imprs-gbgc.de

The IMPRS is funded by the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science. Internationally renowned scientists from both, the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry and the Friedrich Schiller University Jena collaborate at the Research School.

Jena - the German City of Science in 2008 - is a young and dynamic university town with innovative international research and industry and a rich cultural scene in an attractive landscape.

Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry
Hans Knoell Str. 10
07745 Jena
Germany
Contact:
Anna Goerner
phone: +49 3641 57 62 60
email: imprs-gbgc@bgc-jena.mpg.de

Susanne Hermsmeier | idw
Further information:
http://www.imprs-gbgc.de

Further reports about: Carbon IMPRS Oxygen Science TV biogeochemistry computer science human activity nitrogen

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