Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

MPIB Scientists Receive EMBO Awards

07.11.2011
The European Molecular Biology Organisation EMBO stands for Europe-wide cutting-edge research in life sciences. EMBO supports young talented researchers in their career and systematically stimulates national and international scientific exchange.

Now the organisation has acknowledged the outstanding research work of three scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB): Esben Lorentzen and Frank Schnorrer received the EMBO Young Investigator Award, Jürg Müller was elected as an EMBO member.

Today, EMBO has selected two scientists at the MPIB as EMBO Young Investigators. As of January 2012, Esben Lorentzen and Frank Schnorrer will each receive an annual financial award of 15,000 euros for three years. Furthermore, EMBO supports the young scientists with a mentoring program, various courses and symposia, as well as the possibility of intensive networking with other national and international researchers. The EMBO Young Investigator Programme was launched in 2000 in order to honor and support the best European young scientists in molecular biology.

Delivery Service for Cilia
Tiny hair-like structures (cilia) are found on the surface of most cells, where they serve to move the cell, process external signals and coordinate the correct arrangement of the inner organs. To do this, cilia have to be supplied with the right building blocks. This complex process is known as Intraflagellar Transport (IFT). Errors in the IFT can lead to defects in the cilia’s architecture as well as to diseases with mental and physical disorders. With his research group “Structural Biology of Cilia” Esben Lorentzen investigates how the IFT works in detail. By means of X-ray crystallography, he was already able to decipher the structure of a part of the IFT complex and there is more to follow. The results could help to prevent defects in the cilia’s architecture and diseases.
Flying Power Packs
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has different types of muscles and thus can fulfil various behaviors such as crawling, running or, of course, flying. With the aid of targeted gene modifications, Frank Schnorrer and his colleagues in the research group “Muscle Dynamics” investigate how the muscles of the fruit fly develop at the right place in the body and build their contractile apparatus. By performing more than 25,000 flight tests, the scientists could identify about 2,000 genes that have a function in the fly’s muscles. Many of the identified genes are supposedly needed for normal muscle function in humans, too. Given that genetic changes often lead to degenerative muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy, the results could also be of medical importance.
Jürg Müller Is New EMBO Member
The organisation EMBO recently elected 46 scientists from 14 countries to life-long EMBO members – among them Jürg Müller from the MPIB. With it, EMBO appreciates the scientists’ outstanding contribution to cutting-edge research in the life sciences. Every year, the altogether 1,500 EMBO members select many talented scientists whose career then is supported by EMBO, and in this way have a big influence on the future of life sciences. The members of EMBO belong to the best European researchers and are regarded as leading scientists in their field.

Depending on the cell type and the developmental status, only a fraction of the cell’s genetic material is used, the rest is inactive. With his research group “Chromatin Biology” Jürg Müller aims to answer the following questions: What decides about which genes are used? What is the mechanism of this regulation? Using genetic, biophysical and biochemical methods, the scientists discovered that proteins of the Polycomb and Trithorax group modify the genetic material chromatin and in this way affect the activity of genes. Now they want to dissect the mechanism by which these modifications silence or activate genes over many cell generations. The results could also be medically important because, in humans, errors in the Polycomb and Trithorax system are associated with cancer. [UD]

Contact
Dr. Esben Lorentzen
Structural Biology of Cilia
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Am Klopferspitz 18
82152 Martinsried
E-Mail: lorentze@biochem.mpg.de
http://www.biochem.mpg.de/lorentzen
Dr. Frank Schnorrer
Muscle Dynamics
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Am Klopferspitz 18
82152 Martinsried
E-Mail: schnorrer@biochem.mpg.de
http://www.biochem.mpg.de/schnorrer
Dr. Jürg Müller
Chromatin Biology
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Am Klopferspitz 18
82152 Martinsried
E-Mail: muellerj@biochem.mpg.de
http://www.biochem.mpg.de/mueller
Anja Konschak
Public Relations
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Am Klopferspitz 18
82152 Martinsried
Tel. +49 89 8578-2824
E-Mail: konschak@biochem.mpg.de

Anja Konschak | Max-Planck-Institut
Further information:
http://www.biochem.mpg.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Scientist at Kiel University receive EU funding to develop new implantats
22.11.2017 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

nachricht Tracking down the origins of gold
08.11.2017 | Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien gGmbH

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Underwater acoustic localization of marine mammals and vehicles

23.11.2017 | Information Technology

Enhancing the quantum sensing capabilities of diamond

23.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to storing carbon

23.11.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>