Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Jury and Public Choose the Best CT images of Right Dose Image Contest

21.10.2013
- Most interesting cases submitted by users from all over the world
- Online public voting starts today
- Clinical images show how Siemens technologies help reduce radiation exposure in computed tomography

This year, Siemens Healthcare held its third contest regarding outstanding results in clinical imaging in computed tomography. Starting today, members of the public with an interest in CT are invited to go online and vote for the best image in the "Right Dose Image Contest."


Copyright: Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Netherlands

In addition to the public vote, winners of a "Right Dose Excellence Award" will be chosen by an international jury of experts for eight specialist categories. Decisive factors for the jury are not only high diagnostic quality of the clinical images, but also the fact that participants acquired their excellent image quality with the right radiation dosage.

This was achieved, for example, by Dr. Thomas Zelesny of Göppingen, Germany, and Ronald Booij of Rotterdam, Netherlands: Zelesny needed a dose of just 0.78 millisievert (mSv) to image the coronary vessels of a 65-year-old patient. Booij produced a CT scan of a seven-month-old baby with the extremely low dose of 0.28 mSv.

In total, 197 medical practices and clinical institutions from all over the world participated in the contest, all of which use a CT scanner from the Siemens Somatom family. Each of the many submitted images shows how users made the most of Siemens technology to reduce dose, thus underscoring the Healthcare Sector's innovative strength as part of the Agenda 2013 Initiative.

Whether tall or short, slim or large – every patient is different. That means that the right dose may vary greatly from one individual to another, depending on the clinical issue. It's not always useful to focus on reducing radiation as far as possible. What still really counts in dealing responsibly with X-ray based computed tomography is the ALARA principle (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). If the dose is too low and the clinical images ultimately do not provide sufficient diagnostic information, then even the lowest applied dose is still too high. That is why it is so important to apply exactly the right dose for each individual scan.

The images from the contest demonstrate the role that Siemens Right Dose technologies play in this. Take the image submitted by Ronald Booij, of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands, of an aortic isthmus stenosis – a narrowing of the body's main artery – in a seven-month-old baby. This congenital arterial malformation was clearly documented using the Dual Source CT Somatom Definition Flash – the only CT with two X-ray tubes – thus ruling out a suspected malformed, doubled aortic arch. And Booij achieved this with an effective dose of just 0.28 millisievert (mSv), less than one-eighth of natural background radiation over one year, and without any kind of sedation – an aspect that is just as important in pediatrics as particularly careful use of radiation. As Booij writes in his article for the contest, the Care kV application – which automatically chose the right tube voltage of 70 kilovolts (kV) for the scan – and Safire, a technique for raw-data based iterative image reconstruction, provided significant help in "achieving optimal image quality at the lowest possible dose."

Dr. Thomas Zelesny, of Alb-Fils-Kliniken in Göppingen, Germany, submitted a cardiac scan of a 65-year-old woman, taken with the Somatom Definition AS. A detailed image of the coronary arteries was needed to rule out the possibility of coronary heart disease. Here, Care kV chose a tube voltage of 100 kV, and the Care Dose4D application automatically adjusted the tube current to the patient's anatomy during the scan. Zelesny also used Safire image reconstruction to reduce image noise that would otherwise increase appreciably at reduced radiation doses. The result was excellent diagnostic image quality, showing even the smaller lateral vessels of the coronary arteries, and at a dose of only 0.78 mSv. "So that we can use the right dose for each patient, as we did here, each scan we carry out takes advantage of every feature the CT scanner has to offer," Zelesny explains.

In addition to these two categories – vascular imaging and cardiology – the Right Dose Excellence Award is also given in neurology, oncology, pediatrics, routine examinations (as for example in diagnosing unexplained abdominal pain), trauma, and Dual Energy. This year there is also a special prize for sustainable dose management open to institutions who submit two or more cases and who also share their dose reduction experiences and strategies with other Siemens CT users. The winners will be chosen by an international jury of experts, including members of the Sierra Initiative (Siemens Radiation Reduction Alliance). Starting today, those interested can vote for the 2013 public award for the best CT image at www.siemens.com/image-contest. The prizes will be presented in December at the 99th Convention of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) in Chicago.

Find all the articles and entries at health.siemens.com/ct/image-contest or join the more than 17,000 fans of the Right Dose Image Contest on Facebook at www.facebook.com/imagecontest.

Launched in November 2011, Agenda 2013 is an initiative of the Siemens Healthcare Sector to further strengthen its innovative power and competitiveness. Specific measures, which will be implemented by the end of 2013, have been defined in four fields of action: innovation, competitiveness, regional footprint, and people development.

Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/siemens_press

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 51,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2012 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 13.6 billion euros and profit of 1.8 billion euros. For further information please visit: http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

The products/features (here mentioned) are not commercially available in all countries. Due to regulatory reasons their future availability cannot be guaranteed. Further details are available from the local Siemens organizations.

Reference Number: HIM201310003e

Contact
Mr. Ulrich Künzel
Healthcare Sector
Siemens AG
Henkestr. 127
91052 Erlangen
Germany
Tel: +49 (9131) 84-3473
Ulrich.Kuenzel​@siemens.com

Ulrich Künzel | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Eduard Arzt receives highest award from German Materials Society
21.09.2017 | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

nachricht Six German-Russian Research Groups Receive Three Years of Funding
12.09.2017 | Hermann von Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>