Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Illinois engineer receives Humboldt Research Award

17.01.2013
University of Illinois aerospace engineering professor Scott R. White has been chosen to receive the prestigious Humboldt Research Award honoring a lifetime of research achievements.

The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Bonn, Germany, annually honors up to 100 researchers elected by a multinational, multidisciplinary panel of scholars. According to the foundation, the recipients are “academics whose fundamental discoveries, new theories, or insights have had a significant impact on their own discipline and beyond and who are expected to continue producing cutting-edge academic achievements in future.”

White is a leading researcher in the field of autonomous materials – synthetic materials that respond and adapt to situations on their own. His research applies principles of biological systems, such as healing and vasculature, to materials such as plastics, electronic circuits and batteries. White is best known for designing materials embedded with microcapsules that rupture when cracked or damaged, filling the cracks and “healing” the plastic or circuit.

Humboldt award recipients are each awarded a prize of 60,000 Euros (nearly $80,000 at current exchange rates) and extended an invitation to pursue research of their choice with colleagues in Germany.

White will use his award to work with professor Peter Fratzl at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam-Golm, Germany. The two will study bio-inspired and biomimetic materials systems.

“Peter Fratzl is one of the world’s foremost authorities in biomaterials,” White said. “His labs offer unprecedented access to scientists, engineers and medical researchers to learn about regeneration and remodeling of materials systems, a topic that I am particularly interested in pursuing in my future research.”

White earned his doctorate in engineering mechanics at the Pennsylvania State University in 1990, joining the faculty at the U. of I. the same year. He also is affiliated with the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. He has received widespread recognition for his work, including Scientific American magazine’s “SciAm 50” award in 2007. Popular Science chose his work as among the Top Ten Innovations in Science in 2001.

Editor’s notes: To reach Scott White, call 217-333-1077;
email swhite@illinois.edu

Liz Ahlberg | University of Illinois
Further information:
http://www.illinois.edu

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Sponges and shells get settled at ZIK B CUBE
18.07.2016 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht What breath reveals: detecting diseases with infrared sensors / prestigious prize for chemists
13.07.2016 | Universität Ulm

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

Partner countries of FAIR accelerator meet in Darmstadt and approve developments

11.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

New movie screen allows for glasses-free 3-D

26.07.2016 | Information Technology

Scientists develop painless and inexpensive microneedle system to monitor drugs

26.07.2016 | Health and Medicine

Astronomers discover dizzying spin of the Milky Way galaxy's 'halo'

26.07.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>