Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Helmholtz supports three research projects along the road to application

04.03.2015

The Helmholtz Association is keen on developing pioneering technologies and making them attractive for industry. It is therefore channelling more than €20 million from its Initiative and Networking Fund into helping scientists quickly move their projects from research to application. Since its launch in 2011, the Validation Fund has financed a total of 21 projects.

Independent assessors have recently recommended to financially supporting three more projects: a continuous production process for more cost efficient manufacturing of composite parts, primarily for the automotive sector; a new therapeutic approach for treating hepatitis B; and a highly innovative treatment for type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
The Helmholtz Association believes these three projects show huge potential for achieving successful commercial application and making a significant contribution to society. All together, the three research projects are to receive a total of some €2.6 million in funding.

Funding to bring research to market
It can sometimes take years for scientific findings to become ready for market. The validation phase in particular can be both exciting and nerve-wracking for researchers. This is where they find out whether their product is ready for market or not. “The Validation Fund provides scientists working at Helmholtz centres with support in the form of advice and financing during this initial phase. The funding allows us to push application-oriented research findings far enough for them to achieve an increase in value and become commercially viable,” says Rolf Zettl, managing director of the Helmholtz Association. He explains that there are various ways of proving that a project is ready for market, such as conducting tests to demonstrate applicability, scaling up the production process, or delivering results from pre-clinical trials. “The Helmholtz Validation Fund is an important instrument for enabling the transfer of highly relevant technologies”, says Zettl.

Three promising projects

COPRO2 – Continuous production of complex preform moulds
In the COPRO2 project, Christian Hühne and his team from the German Aerospace Center (DLR) aim to design and produce more cost-efficient and higher-quality moulds for fibre-reinforced plastic composites (FRP) to be used in the automotive and industrial sector. With this new technology, mould preforms for the supporting structures in car and commercial vehicle bodywork (roof bows, side-member and cross-members on car floors) will be manufactured from dry fibre semi-finished products. COPRO2 offers a fully automated forming process that can be integrated into existing FRP production processes, replacing partly automated or less-efficient processes. Customers include part manufacturers as well as suppliers for the automotive industry as well as for industrial applications. The research team guarantees that the COPRO2 process will achieve a 35-percent reduction in manufacturing costs compared to conventional methods. Moreover, COPRO2 is improving the quality of the parts, and can be directly implemented into serial production – an advantage that sets it apart from competitors.

New hepatitis B therapy with bispecific antibodies
The validation project, being undertaken by Ulrike Protzer and Felix Bohne of Helmholtz Zentrum München together with Frank Momburg of the German Cancer Research Center, focuses on a new curative therapy concept for patients with chronic hepatitis B. It could also be applied to liver cell carcinoma caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The new therapy approach involves a combination of two bispecific antibodies, which are intended to bind to the harmful hepatitis B virus as well as to activate the beneficial T-cells. Currently, the gold standard treatment for hepatitis B only hinders the reproduction of the virus rather than eradicating it. The bispecific antibody therapy, however, is based on a curative treatment of the virus infection in the liver. This approach is particularly interesting for pharmaceutical companies, since it could be relevant for other diseases caused by viruses. Following the successful pre-clinical validation, it is expected that pharmaceutical companies will license and further develop the bispecific antibodies. Medical demand is extremely high: up to 350 million people worldwide suffer from chronic hepatitis B. About 600,000 of those affected die every year from a HBV infection.

DigEST – New therapy for treating diabetes
Stephan Herzig’s research group at the Institute for Diabetes and Cancer at Helmholtz Zentrum München is planning to investigate the effectiveness of a new diabetes therapy in cooperation with the German Cancer Research Center. The approach acts to eliminate a particular element in the liver, which in turn improves the sensitivity of the liver and other organs to insulin. The target molecule plays a key role in regulating the insulin signal transduction pathway, and therefore offers a new starting point in diabetes therapy. Above all, the approach could offer a long-awaited alternative therapy for patients who are unresponsive to standard therapies, or whose treatment is restricted due to kidney damage caused by diabetes. Initial studies indicate that the deactivation of the protein identified by the research team can prevent abnormally high blood glucose levels, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance as well as significantly improve existing diabetes conditions. The validation process will investigate the basic interaction between the active component and the organism as well as the therapy’s safety and effectiveness. Following further clinical development with pharmaceutical partners, a new active component for treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes could be brought to the market. That would mean a breakthrough for the treatment of diabetes: with an ever-growing number of more than 380 million people suffering from diabetes, it is one of the most-widespread diseases in the world.

The Helmholtz Association contributes to solving major challenges facing society, science and the economy with top scientific achievements in six research fields: Energy; Earth and Environment; Health; Key Technologies; Matter; and Aeronautics, Space and Transport. With almost 37,000 employees in 18 research centres and an annual budget of approximately €3.99 billion, the Helmholtz Association is Germany’s largest scientific organisation. Its work follows in the tradition of the great natural scientist Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894).

Contacts for the Media:

Janine Tychsen
Deputy Head Communications and Media Relations
Tel.: +49 (0)30 206 329-24
janine.tychsen@helmholtz.de

Jörn Krupa
Head of Technology Transfer
Tel.: +49 (0)30 206 329-72
joern.krupa@helmholtz.de

Communications and Media Relations
Office Berlin
Anna-Louisa-Karsch-Str. 2
10178 Berlin

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.helmholtz.de

http://www.helmholtz.de/socialmedia

Jan-Martin Wiarda | Hermann von Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht BMBF funding for diabetes research on pancreas chip
08.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann
20.01.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>