Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gustav Hertz Prize of DPG for Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis

20.11.2012
Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis, a research group leader at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Garching (Germany), has been named as the recipient of the 2013 Gustav Hertz Award of the German Physical Society (DPG).
This DPG award is in particular given to young physicists in recognition of a recent scientific achievement, in order to encourage young physics students. Dr. Goulielmakis will be presented with this prize for “outstanding contributions in the field of attosecond physics, in particular for his work on the attosecond control of light fields and their use for tracing the motion of electrons in atoms in real time which paves the way towards controlling matter on a nanoscopic scale with unprecedented precision.”

Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis, born in 1975 in Heraklion (Greece), received his B.SC. and Master’s degree from the Physics Department of the University of Crete (Greece), in 2000 and 2002 respectively, and his PhD from the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU), Germany, in 2005. He then worked as a scientist in the Division of Attosecond Physics (led by Prof. Ferenc Krausz), being one of the project leaders of the Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP). In 2010 he received an ERC Starting Grant of the European Research Council which enabled him to start his own research group “Attoelectronics”.

In his dissertation Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis focused on the development of what is of central importance in attosecond science and metrology today: the attosecond streaking technique. This technique utilized the ultrafast field variation of light pulses in order to capture fast electronic phenomena of the microcosm. Other than its important implications for the understanding of quantum mechanical processes, the technique allowed the establishment of a novel – and up to date unique – method for capturing the field waveform of light waves.

Some of his most remarkable achievements are the generation of the shortest isolated burst of electromagnetic radiation generated to date lasting as short as 80 attoseconds (1 as = 10 to the -18 s) in 2008 as well as the use of such bursts to trace, in real time, the motion of electrons in atoms in 2010. More recently Dr. Goulielmakis and his research group Attoelectronics focused on developing the world’s first Light Field Synthesizer, an experimental apparatus that manipulates extremely broadband light pulses that span from the ultraviolet to the deep infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

It allows scientists – for the first time – to synthesize and to tailor the field waveform of a light pulse with sub-optical cycle resolution and attosecond precision. These light transients offer yet a more sophisticated platform for controlling electrons with light and open up new ways to manipulating the microcosm at unprecedented temporal precision. Important implications of these developments, in the years to come, may be anticipated in areas such as photonics, chemistry and nanotechnology.

Dr. Goulielmakis is also the recipient of the Foteinos Prize of the Academy of Athens in 2007 and the “IUPAP Young Scientist Prize in Optics” from the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics in 2010. The Gustav Hertz Award will be prsented to Eleftherios Goulielmakis on the occasion of the next annual meeting of the German Physical Society, which will take place in Dresden in March 2013. Olivia Meyer-Streng

Contact:
Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis
Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics
Laboratory for Attosecond Physics
Research Group Attoelectronics
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany
Phone: +49( 0) 89 32 905 -632
Fax:+49 (0) 89 32 905 -200
e-mail: eleftherios.goulielmakis@mpq.mpg.de
www.attoworld.de/goulielmakis-group

Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng
Press & Public Relations
Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany
Phone: +49(0) 89 32 905 -213
Fax:+49(0) 89 32 905 -200
e-mail: olivia.meyer-streng@mpq.mpg.de

Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng | Max-Planck-Institut
Further information:
http://www.mpq.mpg.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht International research project gets high level of funding
02.09.2015 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

nachricht Production research by Fraunhofer IAO honored with three awards at the ICPR 2015
31.08.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact Inverter for Uninterruptible Power Supplies

Silicon Carbide Components Enable Efficiency of 98.7 percent

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE have developed a highly compact and efficient inverter for use in uninterruptible power...

Im Focus: How wind sculpted Earth's largest dust deposit

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from University of Arizona geoscientists. The study is the first to explain how the steep-fronted plateau formed.

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from...

Im Focus: An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets

The leaves of the lotus flower, and other natural surfaces that repel water and dirt, have been the model for many types of engineered liquid-repelling surfaces. As slippery as these surfaces are, however, tiny water droplets still stick to them. Now, Penn State researchers have developed nano/micro-textured, highly slippery surfaces able to outperform these naturally inspired coatings, particularly when the water is a vapor or tiny droplets.

Enhancing the mobility of liquid droplets on rough surfaces could improve condensation heat transfer for power-plant heat exchangers, create more efficient...

Im Focus: Increasingly severe disturbances weaken world's temperate forests

Longer, more severe, and hotter droughts and a myriad of other threats, including diseases and more extensive and severe wildfires, are threatening to transform some of the world's temperate forests, a new study published in Science has found. Without informed management, some forests could convert to shrublands or grasslands within the coming decades.

"While we have been trying to manage for resilience of 20th century conditions, we realize now that we must prepare for transformations and attempt to ease...

Im Focus: OU astrophysicist and collaborators find supermassive black holes in quasar nearest Earth

A University of Oklahoma astrophysicist and his Chinese collaborator have found two supermassive black holes in Markarian 231, the nearest quasar to Earth, using observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The discovery of two supermassive black holes--one larger one and a second, smaller one--are evidence of a binary black hole and suggests that supermassive...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Together - Work - Experience

03.09.2015 | Event News

Networking conference in Heidelberg for outstanding mathematicians and computer scientists

20.08.2015 | Event News

Scientists meet in Münster for the world’s largest Chitin und Chitosan Conference

20.08.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Lighter with Laser Welding

03.09.2015 | Process Engineering

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base

03.09.2015 | Materials Sciences

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered

03.09.2015 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>