Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Eva-Maria and Eckhard Mandelkow have been awarded the Potamkin Prize

15.04.2011
Targets for Alzheimer therapy

Drs Eva-Maria and Eckhard Mandelkow, researchers at the Max Planck Unit for Structural Molecular Biology at DESY (Hamburg) and at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Bonn, have been honored with the Potamkin Prize from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) for their contributions to the field of dementia research.

The award ceremony takes place on 14 April at the Annual Meeting of the AAN in Honolulu (Hawaii). Eva-Maria and Eckhard Mandelkow share the prize, endowed with 100 000 U.S. dollars, with Dennis Dickson (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida). The Potamkin Prize is one of the most prestigious awards in the field of dementia research. Since 1988, this important scientific honor is donated by the Potamkin entrepreneurial family from New York.

Together with their team, Eva-Maria and Eckhard Mandelkow have achieved major breakthroughs in Alzheimer research through their work on a protein termed tau. In the normal state tau strengthens the cytoskeleton in neurons and is involved in the transport of cell organelles. But very early in Alzheimer's disease it changes, becomes detached from the cytoskeleton and lumps together as cellular debris.

In their seminal work Eva-Maria and Eckhard Mandelkow investigated the mechanism of pathological tau aggregation and showed which parts of the protein are crucial for this process. Insights from this research then allowed them to investigate the consequences of tau protein aggregation in nerve cells in more detail using mouse and cellular models. The result showed that only forms of tau that are capable of aggregation destroy the synapses of nerve cells. If these forms of tau accumulate in neurons the mice perform poorly in learning and memory tests, thus showing typical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. If the production of toxic tau in the cells of the mice is halted, synapses regenerate and the mice recover from their memory disorder. This crucial observation shows that the disease process is in principle reversible. With this work Eva-Maria and Eckhard Mandelkow provide an important starting point for the development of potential therapies. Their investigations on tau structure and their mouse experiments now allow the identification of drugs that counteract the toxic properties of tau and - at least in mice - can combat cognitive impairment.

Dr. Eckhard Mandelkow studied physics and earned his doctorate at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg on the structure of virus proteins. In his postdoctoral training at Brandeis University (Massachusetts, USA) he looked into proteins of the cytoskeleton and then continued this line of research with a focus on the structure and function of neuronal proteins, especially of motor proteins and tau proteins and their pathological changes during neurodegeneration. He is head of a laboratory of the Max Planck Society at the German Electron Synchrotron DESY and is currently building a new research group at the DZNE site in Bonn.

Dr. Eva-Maria Mandelkow studied medicine and worked for several years as physician in the clinic and then shifted her focus to basic research. She earned her doctorate at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg on a topic in muscle physiology. In subsequent research stays at Brandeis University (Massachusetts, USA), Scripps Research Institute (La Jolla, California) and at the MRC Laboratory in Cambridge (United Kingdom) she worked on proteins of the cytoskeleton. Eva-Maria Mandelkow heads a research group at the Max Planck lab in Hamburg, which deals with cell and mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. She also moves to the DZNE in Bonn as a group leader in 2011.

Contact information:
Drs. Eva-Maria und Eckhard Mandelkow
Max Planck Research Unit for Structural Molecular Biology
c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn
Tel: +49 (0)40-89982801, +49 (0)228-43302-263
Email: office@mpasmb.desy.de, mandelkow@dzne.de
Dr. Katrin Weigmann
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
Press- and Public Relations
Tel: +49 (0) 228 43302 /263
Mobil: +49 (0) 173 – 5471350
Email: katrin.weigmann@dzne.de

Katrin Weigmann | idw
Further information:
http://www.dzne.de
http://www.mpasmb-hamburg.mpg.de
http://www.aan.com/science/awards/?fuseaction=home.info&id=13

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Extensive Funding for Research on Chromatin, Adrenal Gland, and Cancer Therapy
28.06.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Otto Hahn Medal for Jaime Agudo-Canalejo
21.06.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kolloid- und Grenzflächenforschung

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>