Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EU supports projects on atmosphere research with 36 million euros

06.12.2013
The research cluster “Aerosols and Climate“ starts at the AWI Potsdam

The new research cluster “Aerosols and Climate” started on Thursday 5 December with a kick-off meeting at the Potsdam Research Unit of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI). It brings together three projects, which deal with the interactions between aerosols and climate.

The scientists involved want to minimise the great uncertainties in understanding the aerosol processes, which are emphasised in the last World Climate Report (IPCC). The EU is supporting the cluster in the coming four and a half years with a total of 36 million euros.

The role of the aerosols has so far been one of the greatest unknowns in climate predictions. Aerosols – small droplets or particles floating in the air – reflect a part of the sunlight before it reaches the ground and they also radiate heat themselves. Furthermore they play an important role in the formation of clouds and influence the chemistry of the atmosphere. The formation of aerosols is frequently dependent on climate processes. This complicated interaction has not so far been correctly reflected in global climate models.

“We do not understand many of the processes adequately to be able to correctly reflect the variations of aerosols in the atmosphere in climate models”, explains Dr. Markus Rex, atmosphere researcher at the Potsdam Research Unit of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research. For example, there are sulphuric acid droplets high above the Arctic, which considerably influence the Arctic climate. However, scientists have so far only had a rough understanding of their origin. “We know that the sulphur originates from the Tropics and we suspect that the resultant aerosols are transported in the Asiatic monsoon over the Himalayas to the Polar stratosphere”, says Markus Rex.

However, where the aerosols precisely come from and why the stratospheric aerosol layer is subject to great fluctuations even if no volcanoes are active is currently unclear. As part of the StratoClim project, he and his colleagues want to conduct measurements in the Asian monsoon using a high-altitude research aircraft and set up a new measurement station in the tropical Western Pacific. Rex explains: “We first need to understand the processes about which quantities of aerosols are transported how and under which conditions. We then reflect these processes using detailed mathematical models. These results are then incorporated into global climate models, thereby reducing the uncertainties of future scenarios.”

To concentrate competences in aerosol research, the EU has merged three research applications in a cluster. The research cluster was launched on 5 December with the public presentation of the three projects starting in the Albert Einstein Science Park in Potsdam. The project members met in closed workshops in the afternoon.

Background to the EU cluster “Aerosols and Climate”
“Aerosols and Climate” brings together three projects:
• DACCIWA (Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa) headed by Prof. Peter Knippertz from the Karlsruhe Institut für Technologie (KIT)
• BACCHUS (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding) under the lead of Prof. Ulrike Lohmann from the ETH Zürich

• StratoClim (Stratospheric and upper tropospheric processes for better climate predictions), which is led by Dr. Markus Rex from AWI Potsdam.

Further information is available at http://www.Aerosols-Climate.org/.

Notes for Editors: Your contact persons at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Potsdam is Dr. Markus Rex (phone +49 331 288-2127; e-mail: Markus.Rex@awi.de). Your contact person in the Department of Communications and Media Relations is Dr. Folke Mehrtens (phone +49 471 4831-2007; e-mail: medien@awi.de).

Please find printable images on our website: http://www.awi.de/en/news/press_releases/

The Alfred Wegener Institute conducts research in the Arctic and Antarctic and in the high and mid-latitude oceans. The Institute coordinates German polar research and provides important infrastructure such as the research ice breaker Polarstern and stations in the Arctic and Antarctic to the international scientific world. The Alfred Wegener Institute is one of the 18 research centres of the Helmholtz Association, the largest scientific organisation in Germany.

Ralf Röchert | idw
Further information:
http://www.awi.de/en/news/press_releases/
http://www.Aerosols-Climate.org/

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Innovation Award of the United Nations Environment Programme for PhD Student from ZMT
22.03.2018 | Leibniz-Zentrum für Marine Tropenforschung (ZMT)

nachricht ERC Project set to boost application of adhesive structures
19.03.2018 | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>