Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Competition for young journalists enters the sixth round

18.11.2008
Young editors of school student newspapers and campus media are again called upon to exercise their journalistic skills in the subject field of automation.

In this, the sixth round of the technical journalism competition organized by Siemens and the ZVEI (German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association), school pupils and students interested in journalism can do their research at trade fairs and produce articles, as well as radio or TV programs, on the topic of relevant technologies or careers.

Their work is assessed by a jury. The prizes to be won include books, practical training placements in editorial offices, and a practical workshop at a journalism academy. The venues for the 6th technical journalism competition, under the auspices of the ministries of education of the Federal States of Bavaria and Lower Saxony, are Nuremberg and Hanover.

There is a widespread prejudice that "Technology experts don't know how to formulate decent texts, and good writers don't understand anything about technology". The idea behind the technical journalism competition run by Siemens Drive Technologies and the ZVEI (German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association) is that school pupils and students should prove this popular misconception wrong. In the sixth round of the competition, up-and-coming journalists can do their research at the SPS/IPC/Drives fair, to be held from November 25 to 27 in Nuremberg, as well as at next year's Hanover Fair, which will run from April 20 to 24, 2009.

A few days before each of these events the contestants will have an opportunity to attend voluntary workshops in the respective cities, where they will be able to polish up their journalistic skills and acquaint themselves with new techniques for holding interviews, doing research and producing reports. They will also pick up information on the topic of automation, and about the two fairs too.

The entries submitted will be judged by a jury of experts. The best performers will qualify to take part in a practical workshop at a journalism academy. There will also be prizes, in addition to practical assignments and placements in editorial and press offices. The competition is open to editors of school student newspapers, school radio stations or campus media, and also to youths and young adults with a general interest in journalism. Information including deadlines for applying, along with dates of workshops and of prizegiving, is available at: www.siemens.de/technikjournalismus .

A purpose of the competition is to give youths and young adults a chance to familiarize themselves with automation through journalistic channels and to get to grips with various technologies in that sector. Such prior knowledge can be a significant advantage, both in technical careers and in relevant courses of study alike. The editorial offices of technical journals, just like the technical and business departments of the media, are equally on the lookout for qualified young staff. In recent years nearly 500 budding journalists from schools and colleges have participated in the competition, including a large number of young women.

Volker M. Banholzer | Siemens Industry Automation
Further information:
http://www.siemens.de/technikjournalismus

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht The quest for the oldest ice on Earth
14.11.2016 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht Empa Innovation Award for new flame retardant
09.11.2016 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Predicting unpredictability: Information theory offers new way to read ice cores

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Sea ice hit record lows in November

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

New material could lead to erasable and rewriteable optical chips

07.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>