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Competition for young journalists enters the sixth round

18.11.2008
Young editors of school student newspapers and campus media are again called upon to exercise their journalistic skills in the subject field of automation.

In this, the sixth round of the technical journalism competition organized by Siemens and the ZVEI (German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association), school pupils and students interested in journalism can do their research at trade fairs and produce articles, as well as radio or TV programs, on the topic of relevant technologies or careers.

Their work is assessed by a jury. The prizes to be won include books, practical training placements in editorial offices, and a practical workshop at a journalism academy. The venues for the 6th technical journalism competition, under the auspices of the ministries of education of the Federal States of Bavaria and Lower Saxony, are Nuremberg and Hanover.

There is a widespread prejudice that "Technology experts don't know how to formulate decent texts, and good writers don't understand anything about technology". The idea behind the technical journalism competition run by Siemens Drive Technologies and the ZVEI (German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association) is that school pupils and students should prove this popular misconception wrong. In the sixth round of the competition, up-and-coming journalists can do their research at the SPS/IPC/Drives fair, to be held from November 25 to 27 in Nuremberg, as well as at next year's Hanover Fair, which will run from April 20 to 24, 2009.

A few days before each of these events the contestants will have an opportunity to attend voluntary workshops in the respective cities, where they will be able to polish up their journalistic skills and acquaint themselves with new techniques for holding interviews, doing research and producing reports. They will also pick up information on the topic of automation, and about the two fairs too.

The entries submitted will be judged by a jury of experts. The best performers will qualify to take part in a practical workshop at a journalism academy. There will also be prizes, in addition to practical assignments and placements in editorial and press offices. The competition is open to editors of school student newspapers, school radio stations or campus media, and also to youths and young adults with a general interest in journalism. Information including deadlines for applying, along with dates of workshops and of prizegiving, is available at: www.siemens.de/technikjournalismus .

A purpose of the competition is to give youths and young adults a chance to familiarize themselves with automation through journalistic channels and to get to grips with various technologies in that sector. Such prior knowledge can be a significant advantage, both in technical careers and in relevant courses of study alike. The editorial offices of technical journals, just like the technical and business departments of the media, are equally on the lookout for qualified young staff. In recent years nearly 500 budding journalists from schools and colleges have participated in the competition, including a large number of young women.

Volker M. Banholzer | Siemens Industry Automation
Further information:
http://www.siemens.de/technikjournalismus

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