Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Brupbacher Prize goes to cancer researcher Michael Karin

29.01.2013
Molecular biologist Michael Karin is to receive this year’s Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize for Cancer Research in recognition of his studies on the role of chronic inflammation in the development of tumors.

The award, which carries CHF 100,000 in prize money, is considered one of the highest accolades for cancer researchers worldwide. The awards ceremony takes place in Zurich this Thursday in the framework of an international symposium on “Breakthroughs in Cancer Research and Therapy”.

Molecular biologist Michael Karin is to receive this year’s Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize for Cancer Research in recognition of his studies on the role of chronic inflammation in the development of tumors. The award, which carries CHF 100,000 in prize money, is considered one of the highest accolades for cancer researchers worldwide. The awards ceremony takes place in Zurich this Thursday in the framework of an international symposium on “Breakthroughs in Cancer Research and Therapy”.

On Thursday, 31 January 2013, the Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize will be awarded for the 11th time to a scientist for outstanding achievements in cancer research. This year’s award goes to Michael Karin, professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of California in San Diego.

Michael Karin is one of the most cited authors in biomedical science. He made a name for himself with his fundamental studies on the role of chronic inflammation in tumor development, such as hepatic cancer following an infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses or stomach cancer through an infection with the gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori. A specific viral or bacterial pathogen, however, is not necessary because any chronic inflammatory damage to the intestinal mucosa carries a significantly increased risk of colon cancer. This includes immunologically induced inflammatory bowel diseases.

Evidence of causal link between inflammation and carcinogenesis

Karin is an internationally renowned expert on signaling pathways, transduction pathways that enable cells to respond to external influences. Karin is particularly interested in the influence of stress and infections. He showed how the cell’s normal signaling pathways can go awry in the event of chronic infections, with cancer as a possible consequence.

Michael Karin’s work has greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular basis of tumour development and is of vital importance in devising new strategies for prevention and therapy.

Public lecture by Gottfried Schatz and prizes for young scientists

On the eve of the award ceremony, the Brupbacher Foundation is holding a public lecture by Professor Gottfried Schatz entitled “Die tragische Substanz. Wie genetische Fehler Alterung und Krebs bewirken”. Schatz is emeritus professor of the University of Basel and a biochemist of international standing – especially in the field of mitochondria, the energy-providing powerhouses in the cell.

The last item on the symposium’s program is devoted to young scientists: Up to five junior researchers will receive a Young Investigator Award at the conclusion of the symposium on Friday morning.

Beat Müller | Universität Zürich
Further information:
http://www.uzh.ch

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Extensive Funding for Research on Chromatin, Adrenal Gland, and Cancer Therapy
28.06.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Otto Hahn Medal for Jaime Agudo-Canalejo
21.06.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kolloid- und Grenzflächenforschung

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>