Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Arkansas Receives $3.3 Million Grant From National Science Foundation

04.09.2009
Arkansas scientists, students and information-technology workers will benefit from a new $3.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

The award, made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, will enable researchers at the University of Arkansas and other colleges and universities in the state to build and support cyberinfrastructure and to train students and workers in information-technology systems, tools and services.

The grant, titled CI-TRAIN, or Cyberinfrastructure for Transformational Scientific Discovery in Arkansas and West Virginia, is part of a broader award to create a research consortium between the two states, which have researchers specializing in high-performance computing, visualization and modeling. At the University of Arkansas specifically, the federal funding will enhance supercomputing resources at the Arkansas High Performance Computing Center, which supports research in computational science, nano- and ferroelectric materials, multiscale visualization and many other research projects that require massive data storage.

“Beyond the critically important goal of helping scientists discover, understand and solve complex problems that affect our lives, this award will enhance undergraduate education, provide training for information-technology workers and support statewide initiatives such as the Arkansas Research and Education Optical Network,” said Amy Apon, professor of computer science and computer engineering, director of the computing center and principal investigator for the project.

In addition to Apon, other University of Arkansas researchers involved in the project are Fred Limp, University Professor, anthropology; Laurent Bellaiche, physics professor; and Douglas Spearot, assistant professor of mechanical engineering. Srinivasan Ramaswamy, professor and chair of the department of computer science at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock is also a co-principal investigator.

From a research perspective, the overall goal of the project is to create a nationally competitive environment for computation and visualization – techniques for creating images, diagrams and animations of scientific concepts and processes – and to develop both hardware and software to create and capture data that will enable a broad range of research in science and engineering. The partnership will include a substantial shared cluster – linked computers operating as a single computer – hosted by the Arkansas High Performance Computing Center.

Specifically, resources provided by the funding will enable research in:

• multiscale geomatics – gathering, storing, processing and delivery of geographic information – and geosciences,
• nanosience, including multiferronics and simulation of defects in nanocrystalline materials,
• real-time image-guided surgery,
• particle-based physics simulations of materials and processes,
• plant secondary cell wall reconstruction,
• scanning optical microscopy, and
• performance models of large-scale clusters that can be applied to large-scale resources.

Research in these areas will lead to design and improvement of devices such as actuators and sensors and products in visualizations, geosciences and virtual world. It will also improve approaches to real-time, image-guided surgery to enable safe obliteration of solid tumors anywhere in the human body. Finally, innovative studies that explore the three-dimensional structures of plant cell walls will assist in understanding how to cost-effectively recover components of the cell wall for use in bio-based product development.

As mentioned above, another primary goal of the funding is to provide education and workforce training in cyberinfrastructure and information technology. This will be accomplished through a network of faculty and professional staff – called Cyberinfrastructure Campus Champions. At each institution, these people will work to broaden the user base and expand operational support and use of the infrastructure.

“The program will provide training for workers who provide operational support for cyberinfrastructure resources, such as supercomputers and high-end visualization tools,” Apon said. “It will also expand integration with existing technology education programs at more than 200 high schools.”

Other participating Arkansas institutions include the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff and Arkansas State University. All Arkansas Research and Education Optical Network member institutions will benefit from the project.

Limp holds the Leica Geosystems Chair in Geospatial Imaging and is director of the University of Arkansas Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies. Bellaiche holds the Twenty-First Century Professorship in Nanotechnology and Science Education.

More information about the NSF grant can be found at http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0918970. For more information about the Arkansas High Performance Computing Center, visit http://hpc.uark.edu/index.html. For more information about the Arkansas Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, visit http://www.cast.uark.edu/.

Matt McGowan | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.uark.edu

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht RNA: a vicious pathway to cancer ?
14.08.2017 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Extensive Funding for Research on Chromatin, Adrenal Gland, and Cancer Therapy
28.06.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>