Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

2010 Underwater Photography Contest Winners Announced

28.05.2010
In its sixth annual Underwater Photography Contest, the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science attracted a diverse array of national and international photographic talent representing more than 20 countries and nearly 600 images which competed in three categories: “wide angle,” “macro,” and “fish or marine animal portrait.” Recognition was also given to the best among University of Miami student entries.

Winning images were chosen via anonymous judging by a panel of experts in underwater photography and fine arts, including underwater photographers Myron and Nicole Wang and Rosenstiel School Marine Biology & Fisheries Professor Dr. Michael Schmale. The competition is open to all amateur photographers who earn no more than 20 percent of their income from their photography.


Awards included a weeklong trip with Blackbeard’s Cruises and cash prizes. Images of all the winning photos are available at http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/support/advancement/uw-2010/w.html

The Best Overall was an image submitted by Luc Rooman of Kieldrecht, Belgium. The photograph depicts a rare, vivid image of two mating cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) photographed off the coast of The Netherlands.

Other winners, listed by category, include:

Macro

1 - Steven Kovacs, Moore Haven, Fla., USA

2- Wendy Carey, British Columbia, Canada

3- Kirk Kilfoyle, Hollywood, Fla., USA

Fish or Marine Animal Portrait

1- Steven Kovacs, Moore Haven, Fla., USA

2- Matt Potenski, Sayreville, N.J., USA

3- Judy Townsend, Boca Raton, Fla., USA

Wide-angle

1- Annelise Hagan, Berks, United Kingdom

2- Michael Gallagher, London, United Kingdom

3- Mauro Ristorto, Caracas, Venezuela

Student Photos

1- Evan D'Alessandro, Key Biscayne, FL

2- Evan D'Alessandro, Key Biscayne, FL

3- Kristine Stump, Bimini, Bahamas

About the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School

The University of Miami is the largest private research institution in the southeastern United States. The University’s mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940’s, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world’s premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, please visit www.rsmas.miami.edu.

Barbra Gonzalez

UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
305.421.4704
barbgo@rsmas.miami.edu
Marie Guma-Diaz
UM Media Relations Office
305.284.1601
m.gumadiaz@umiami.edu

Barbra Gonzalez
Communications Director
University of Miami
Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Virginia Key, FL 33149
Tel: 305-421-4704
Fax: 305-421-4931

Barbra Gonzalez | University of Miami
Further information:
http://www.rsmas.miami.edu
http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/support/advancement/uw-2010/w.html

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Breakthrough Prize for Kim Nasmyth
04.12.2017 | IMP - Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pathologie GmbH

nachricht The key to chemical transformations
29.11.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>