Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

2010 FEBS/EMBO Women in Science award honours Ingrid Grummt /Outstanding geneticist and committed mentor

10.02.2010
The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) and the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) announced Ingrid Grummt from the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, Germany, as the winner of the 2010 FEBS/EMBO Women in Science Award. Ingrid Grummt has made important contributions to the field of transcriptional regulation in cells throughout her career.

The FEBS/EMBO Women in Science Award, now in its third year, recognizes and rewards the exceptional achievements of a female researcher in molecular biology over the previous five years. Winners of the award are role models who inspire future generations of women in science.

"Ingrid Grummt is an outstanding scientist who has made seminal contributions in the field of regulation of gene expression, including the very recent discoveries that link ageing and some inherited diseases with the silencing of genes required for cell growth," said selection committee member Claudio Sunkel, Director of the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology in Porto, Portugal.

The 2010 winner is distinguished not only for scientific contributions but also for her commitment to the development of European science through her active service on various advisory boards, panels and scientific committees.

"It is important to me to inspire young women to face personal and professional challenges, to help them mobilize their strengths when in doubt and motivate and encourage them to keep their eyes on their goals. I think that integrating career and personal goals makes people happier and more productive in the long run," said the award winner.

Prior to joining the German Cancer Research Center, Ingrid was a post-doctoral fellow at the German Academy of Sciences in Berlin and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Munich, and led a research group at the University in Würzburg, Germany. She was honoured with prestigious awards such as the Science Prize of the Fritz-Winter-Foundation and the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz-Prize for German scientists.

The 2010 FEBS/EMBO Women in Science Award of 10,000 euro will be presented to Ingrid Grummt on 30 June at the 35th FEBS Congress in Gothenburg, Sweden, where she will present a special lecture.

About EMBO

The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) promotes excellence in molecular life sciences in Europe by recognizing and fostering talented scientists. Since 1964, leading scientists are elected annually to become EMBO Members based on proven excellence in research. Members number more than 1,400 today. Fifty-three scientists from the EMBO membership have received the Nobel Prize.

Four leading peer-reviewed journals - The EMBO Journal, EMBO reports, Molecular Systems Biology and EMBO Molecular Medicine - span a broad spectrum of topics of molecular biology and reflect how science is shaping the world.

EMBO funding, training and networking activities impact thousands of scientists every year, promoting collaboration in all areas of molecular biology - within its 27 member states, in Europe and neighbouring countries, and worldwide.

For more information: www.embo.org

About FEBS

The Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) is a leading European organization of the life sciences. Its constituent societies, whose membership exceeds 40,000 in Europe and adjoining countries, extend from Ireland and Iceland in the west, to Armenia in the east.

FEBS promotes research and the teaching of biochemistry, molecular cell biology and molecular biophysics, by supporting an annual congress, a rich program of advanced practical and theoretical courses, workshops and special lectures. These activities are complemented by an extensive fellowships program, enabling mobility of young and senior scientists across the European continent.

FEBS has pioneered the creation of scientific publication forums for European life scientists by its two leading journals, FEBS Journal and FEBS Letters.

Being concerned about Europe's scientific future, FEBS has been involved in the establishment of the European Life Science Forum (ELSF) and the Initiative for Science in Europe (ISE), both active in developing new channels and means for advancing science.

Suzanne Beveridge | idw
Further information:
http://www.febs.org
http://www.embo.org

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Tracking down pest control strategies
31.01.2018 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht Polymers and Fuels from Renewable Resources
29.01.2018 | DECHEMA Gesellschaft für Chemische Technik und Biotechnologie e.V.

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>