Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

2010 Beller Lectureship Award from the American Physical Society for Dr. Nathalie Picqué

30.03.2010
Dr. Nathalie Picqué received the 2010 Beller Lectureship Award "for pioneering work on the application of laser frequency combs to molecular spectroscopy".

This distinction is awarded by the American Physical Society (APS) to non-US exceptional scientists.

A permanent senior research scientist with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France), Dr. Picqué is currently on long-term leave at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, near Munich) and the Ludwig Maximilians Universität München, where she works in the Laser Spectroscopy Division of Professor Theodor W. Hänsch.

Dr. Nathalie Picqué was born on December 2, 1973 in France. She obtained her doctoral degree in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics in 1998 from the Université de Paris-Sud (Orsay, France). She was appointed as a permanent research scientist with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in 2000. Starting in 2005, she became a scientific director at the Laboratoire de Photophysique Moléculaire (Orsay, France).

Dr. Picqué's research focus lies in molecular and laser physics, including in particular Fourier transform spectroscopy, laser frequency combs and precision measurements in molecular spectroscopy. She has done much work developing ways to use laser frequency combs in Fourier transform spectroscopy. One of the projects carried out at the MPQ is the combination of cavity enhancement and frequency comb spectroscopy for molecular trace gas analysis.

Dr. Picqué has already received the 2007 Bronze Medal of the CNRS (best young scientist of the year in the field "Optics and Lasers, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Hot Plasmas" in France), and the 2008 Jean Jerphagnon Prize.

The Beller Lectureship Award was endowed by Esther Hoffman Beller for the purpose of bringing distinguished physicists from abroad as invited speakers at APS meetings. The award has been presented to Dr. Nathalie Picqué at the APS March Meeting (Portland, USA). Dr. Picqué is the fourth French recipient of this distinction, after Prof. Serge Haroche in 1996, Prof. Pierre Gilles de Gennes in 2006 and Prof. Michel Dyakonov in 2009. Olivia Meyer-Streng

For further information please contact:
Dr. Nathalie Picqué
Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1
D-5748 Garching
Phone: +49(0) 89 32905-290
e-mail: nathalie.picque@mpq.mpg.de
Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng
Press & Public Relations Office
Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1
D-5748 Garching
Phone: +49(0) 89 32905-213
e-mail: olivia.meyer-streng@mpq.mpg.de

Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng | idw
Further information:
http://www.mpq.mpg.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Extensive Funding for Research on Chromatin, Adrenal Gland, and Cancer Therapy
28.06.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Otto Hahn Medal for Jaime Agudo-Canalejo
21.06.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kolloid- und Grenzflächenforschung

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>