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Safe driving in city traffic

06.05.2014

UR:BAN research initiative develops assistance systems for city drivers

In future, cars with anticipatory driver assistance systems will help drivers to navigate their way through dense urban traffic without stress and above all safely.


urban driver's assistance

© Fraunhofer IAO

A taste of the solutions capable of transforming this vision into reality will be presented on May 14 by the 31 partners collaborating in the UR:BAN research initiative. The project, which runs to mid-2016, aims to develop new driver assistance systems and solutions for safe and efficient traffic management.

The UR:BAN collaborative research project focuses on cognitive assistance, networked traffic systems, and human factors in traffic. 31 partners – from the automotive sector and its suppliers, electronics and software companies, universities and research institutes – are developing smart, cooperative driver assistance and traffic management systems specifically tailored to the needs of the urban environment. The aim is to define a set of technical specifications for new vehicles that will permit the design of safer and more efficient mobility solutions.

Ideally, a driver assistance system enhances the driver’s ability to handle critical situations and anticipate the dangers typically encountered on the road. A modern system specifically adapted to the urban environment relieves the driver through its optimized human-machine interaction, which allows the driver to concentrate on essential tasks and avoid accidents.

Fraunhofer IAO’s scientists have been working together with Bosch, BMW, Daimler, Opel, and other research partners to investigate behavior prediction and intention detection, for example in connection with braking maneuvers, and how this information might be integrated into driver assistance systems.

Predicting driver intention minimizes reaction times and is the key to significant advances in the urban driving environment. Optimizing systems that provide intuitive assistance based on these findings for urban traffic conditions mitigates hazardous situations and helps prevent accidents.

On May 14, 2014, the partners in this collaborative research project will present the results of their work so far in the giant aircraft hangar at the German Aerospace Center’s (DLR) site in Braunschweig. Some 150 invited guests from industry, research, government departments, urban administrations and the press are expected to attend the event.

The UR:BAN research initiative is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy (BMWi) to the tune of 40 million euros. Industrial partners are contributing a further 40 million euros. In addition to Fraunhofer IAO and other institutes of research, the participants in the project comprise companies in the automotive, software and telecommunications sectors.

Contact:
Frederik Diederichs
Human Factors Engineering
Fraunhofer IAO
Nobelstraße 12
70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Phone +49 711 970-2266
Email frederik.diederichs@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.iao.fraunhofer.de/lang-en/business-areas/engineering-systems/1096-saf...

Juliane Segedi | Fraunhofer-Institut

Further reports about: DLR Human IAO Optimizing accidents cognitive driver assistance Systems traffic management vehicles

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