Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hybrid car makes city driving quick and clean

13.07.2005


EUREKA project E! 2512 MINIMOBIL has developed a vehicle specifically designed for life in Europe’s congested cities that uses a hybrid drive combining the environmental benefits of an electric motor with the range of a petrol engine. The compact city car relieves congested roads and reduces urban pollution.



The MINIMOBIL measures a slim two by one metres, and is little bigger than a motorbike. It is ideal for swiftly moving through traffic, while doors positioned at the front and back make parking simple – in fact four MINIMOBILs can fit into a standard parking space.

“MINIMOBIL is designed to cater for the needs of personal city transport where typically one person is travelling only, with options to cater for more passengers, luggage or sports equipment when needed,” explains Jiri Hofman, project manager at Czech lead partner Dioss Elcom Spol.


Low emission solution

Developed by partners from Austria and the Czech Republic, with a budget of €1.05 million, MINIMOBIL is set to succeed where other electric cars have faltered because it has overcome the problems of short operating range, heavy expensive batteries, long charging time and poor heating by using a hybrid drive. The MINIMOBIL can travel 30 to 50 km by battery alone and up to 350 km when using its low emission petrol engine as well.

The hybrid drive is the heart of the MINIMOBIL, combining an internal combustion engine and an electric motor driven by rechargeable batteries. It offers low energy consumption and low emissions as the hybrid drive uses the environmentally clean electric motor for starting and braking – about 30% of the total journey – and can drive the vehicle continuously at speeds of up to 60 km/h. When more power, higher speeds or longer distances are required, the drive switches to the more powerful petrol engine.

If the driver is confident of a recharging source, the electric motor can be used for city journeys of up to 30 km. Alternatively, preference can be given to the petrol engine, not only saving battery power but also recharging it during the journey. This option is ideal for longer journeys or when a recharging source cannot be guaranteed.

Environmental benefits

“Energy consumption and emissions are much lower in a MINIMOBIL, as it cuts pollutants considerably through use of the electric motor,” says Hofman. “Its low weight – half that of an average small car – and compactness ease city driving and parking.”

In addition, the MINIMOBIL is a very flexible vehicle. The back cabin is adaptable and can be adjusted in stages to carry passengers, shopping or luggage. It can also accommodate wheelchairs, or a ski or bike carrier.

A third prototype is currently being produced as further partners are being sought to fill the expected huge demand for MINIMOBIL vehicles. Initial production will be several thousands of cars, and this is expected to grow to hundreds of thousands, once the vehicles are commercially launched.

“EUREKA played a vital role in the development of the MINIMOBIL,” adds Hofman. “It not only helped us to find the partner we needed, but also gave the project increased recognition and credibility. We’ve already had considerable interest from the USA, but want to launch the MINIMOBIL first in Europe.”

Paul McCallum | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/files/:631617

More articles from Automotive Engineering:

nachricht 3D scans for the automotive industry
16.01.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Improvement of the operating range and increasing of the reliability of integrated circuits
09.11.2016 | Technologie Lizenz-Büro (TLB) der Baden-Württembergischen Hochschulen GmbH

All articles from Automotive Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>