Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Measuring the vibration in car panels to reduce metal fatigue

19.03.2003


With each new vehicle, the car industry faces a fresh battle to cut out the unwanted vibrations that cause irritating rattles and the metal fatigue that can cause parts to break, with potentially lethal consequences.

The complexity of the problems persuaded the German automobile giant BMW to team up with smaller partners to find a new way of designing new vehicles. It got together with Belgian companies LMS International, a world market leader in noise and vibration engineering, optics specialist Labor Dr Steinbichler and the Free University of Brussels in the EUREKA project HOLO-MODAL.

HOLO-MODAL has developed a new way of measuring the way car body panels vibrate that combines traditional vibration measurement with the latest holographic techniques.



Traditional measurement of vibration relies on attaching sensors to a test panel. However, it only measures the vibration at the sensor and attaching too many sensors changes the way the panel moves, altering the results. To gain an accurate picture of the whole panel’s response to vibration, you need to be able to see the effect on every part of the panel’s surface at the same time and without affecting the results. This is where holographic techniques come in.

Holographic analysis avoids physical contact with the test panel by illuminating the whole panel with a laser beam. By measuring the light that is reflected by the panel, the system produces a high-resolution 3-dimensional image of the whole surface as it vibrates.

The HOLO-MODAL partners designed a software package that combines traditional and holographic techniques, controls the hardware and shows how to incorporate the technique into early design work. Now car makers can design body panels that are safer, more durable and save development costs spent on vibration and noise control.

The computer models developed from the measurement data allow the effect of any design changes to be predicted and hence they allow users the chance to try out alternative solutions "on the computer" before actually building them In this way the system helps the development of design solutions.

This new technology can also be used to help design a new generation of safer, more durable and quieter domestic and office appliances and consumer electronic products.

Dr Herman van der Auweraer, project leader at LMS International, says none of the partners could have succeeded on their own.

“EUREKA allowed us to define and work towards a common goal of mutual interest," says van der Auweraer. "The partnership combined complementary capabilities and know-how in structural modelling and laser holography. This combination of technologies was critical to the development of the solution; however neither party had both skills available. The synergy was therefore essential for the success of the project."

"It is however also very relevant that the project combined end-user know-how and research direction. This ensured that the research and development efforts were focused on the real problems and not on academic topics.”

Nicola Vatthauer | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/holomodal

More articles from Automotive Engineering:

nachricht Did you know how many parts of your car require infrared heat?
23.10.2017 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

nachricht Two intelligent vehicles are better than one
04.10.2017 | Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

All articles from Automotive Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Midwife and signpost for photons

11.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

How do megacities impact coastal seas? Searching for evidence in Chinese marginal seas

11.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

PhoxTroT: Optical Interconnect Technologies Revolutionized Data Centers and HPC Systems

11.12.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>