Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Accidental wireless

11.02.2009
Wireless-based sensor system could SAVE lives

Following a rollover automobile accident, driver and passengers are usually unable to call for help. So, unless the accident occurs on a busy road, rescue is unlikely to arrive in time to save them. Writing in the International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems, US researchers describe SAVE, which could solve that problem and reduce deaths on the roads.

Debopam Acharya in the Department of Computer Sciences, at Georgia Southern University, in Statesboro, Georgia, and colleagues are developing a wireless Java-enabled automobile accident reporting system. The system could determine the nature of an accident,and automatically call emergency medical services for possible action.

"Prompt communication is crucial during life-threatening events, such as fire, floods, explosions and traffic accidents, and is especially true for vehicle rollovers and crashes," Acharya and colleagues explain. Indeed, rollover accidents are among the most likely to cause head injury, fractures and explosions in vehicles that would make it impossible for the occupants to summon help.

Similarly, motorcycle riders are also particularly vulnerable to potentially-fatal injury during accidents. The team also points out that situation can be even more treacherous for military personnel during training or maneuvers, as they who may be driving under particularly hazardous conditions off-road and in remote locations.

SAVE, Sun-java-based Automatic VEhicular accident reporting system, uses inexpensive sensor technology, including an inclinometer to detect rollover, and powerful wireless application technology to assess vehicle conditions. It can monitor vehicle incline, temperature, and record rates of deceleration, and airbag deployment. SAVE is also coupled to a global positioning system (GPS) device so that the emergency services can locate the accident quickly and easily.

"In the event of an accident, all this information can be transferred to the response specialists. A suitable combination of these parameters may lead to accurate analysis about the type and severity of accident and hence our system may be used in vehicles intended for different operations, civilian or military," the researchers conclude.

"SAVE: a wireless java enabled automobile accident reporting system" by Debopam Acharya, Vijay Kumar, Gary M. Gaddis, and Nicholas Garvin in Int. J. Intelligent Defence Support Systems, Vol. 1(3), 254-270.

Debopam Acharya | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.georgiasouthern.edu

More articles from Automotive Engineering:

nachricht When your car knows how you feel
20.12.2017 | FZI Forschungszentrum Informatik am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie

nachricht Did you know how many parts of your car require infrared heat?
23.10.2017 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Automotive Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Decoding the structure of the huntingtin protein

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Camera technology in vehicles: Low-latency image data compression

22.02.2018 | Information Technology

Minimising risks of transplants

22.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>