Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Vienna University of Technology tests tunnel fire safety

03.09.2007
As part of a KIRAS project, a consortium managed by construction engineers of the Vienna University of Technology examines the concrete damage and the flattening behavior in case of a tunnel fire. An innovative simulation tool helps evaluate the stability of a damaged tunnel. Three construction projects in Vienna are tested using this newly developed evaluation process.

In the last years, the tunnel fires have shown that the tunnel support structure is severely damaged at an extremely high fire impact. “In some tunnels, up to two thirds of the tunnel inner shell are shattered by explosion. The leftover concrete suffers a severe thermal damage. This combination can lead to structure collapse in the case of one-shell tunnels that are close to upper areas,” clarifies Matthias Zeiml of the Institute for Mechanics of Materials and Structures (IMWS) of the Vienna Universisty of Technology.

He and his colleague from Munich, Roman Lackner (lecturer at IMWS), analyzed, as part of a three-year FWF-project, the “transportation processes in concrete at high temperatures.” “The blowup of the concrete sticks is a consequence of the thermal wedging and of the steam pressure, which develops in the heated concrete and which cannot escape.

These flattenings sometimes reach far behind the reinforced steel,” explains Zeiml. At the same time, University of Technology Professor Ulrich Schneider of the Institute for Building Construction and Technology and the Research Institute of the Austrian Cement Industry (VÖZFI) analyzed the effect of minuscule polypropylene fibers (carpet fibers) which are blended into the concrete. When the concrete is warmed up, adding a few millimeter-long fibers produces channels through which the water steam can escape. This way, flatennings can be effectively prevented.

The results of this fundamental research are now useful to researchers for the KIRAS-Project (Austrian Support Program for Safety Research) of the BMVIT, which received a grant in June. This research project benefits from the participation of a consortium that consists of University Institutes of the Vienna University of Technology and the Vienna University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, infrastructure construction developers (ÖBB, ASFiNAG, Wiener Linien) as well as engineering companies and research laboratories. At the forefront of research there is the development of a new evaluation pattern which for the first time facilitates the prognosis of the vital processes which are influenced by the structure support behavior. “Our project partners - ÖBB, ASFiNAG, and Wiener Linien – are interested in a close to reality prognosis of the tunnel safety level under fire impact. Moreover, we have to answer questions regarding issues such as the need for a temporary support and the extent of the necessary restructuring measures for different fire scenarios,” adds Lackner.

Daniela Ausserhuber | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tuwien.ac.at/index.php?id=5186
http://www.tuwien.ac.at/pr

More articles from Architecture and Construction:

nachricht Concrete from wood
05.07.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

nachricht Modular storage tank for tight spaces
16.03.2017 | FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz-Institut für Informationsinfrastruktur GmbH

All articles from Architecture and Construction >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular volume control

22.08.2017 | Life Sciences

When fish swim in the holodeck

22.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Biochemical 'fingerprints' reveal diabetes progression

22.08.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>