Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Vienna University of Technology tests tunnel fire safety

03.09.2007
As part of a KIRAS project, a consortium managed by construction engineers of the Vienna University of Technology examines the concrete damage and the flattening behavior in case of a tunnel fire. An innovative simulation tool helps evaluate the stability of a damaged tunnel. Three construction projects in Vienna are tested using this newly developed evaluation process.

In the last years, the tunnel fires have shown that the tunnel support structure is severely damaged at an extremely high fire impact. “In some tunnels, up to two thirds of the tunnel inner shell are shattered by explosion. The leftover concrete suffers a severe thermal damage. This combination can lead to structure collapse in the case of one-shell tunnels that are close to upper areas,” clarifies Matthias Zeiml of the Institute for Mechanics of Materials and Structures (IMWS) of the Vienna Universisty of Technology.

He and his colleague from Munich, Roman Lackner (lecturer at IMWS), analyzed, as part of a three-year FWF-project, the “transportation processes in concrete at high temperatures.” “The blowup of the concrete sticks is a consequence of the thermal wedging and of the steam pressure, which develops in the heated concrete and which cannot escape.

These flattenings sometimes reach far behind the reinforced steel,” explains Zeiml. At the same time, University of Technology Professor Ulrich Schneider of the Institute for Building Construction and Technology and the Research Institute of the Austrian Cement Industry (VÖZFI) analyzed the effect of minuscule polypropylene fibers (carpet fibers) which are blended into the concrete. When the concrete is warmed up, adding a few millimeter-long fibers produces channels through which the water steam can escape. This way, flatennings can be effectively prevented.

The results of this fundamental research are now useful to researchers for the KIRAS-Project (Austrian Support Program for Safety Research) of the BMVIT, which received a grant in June. This research project benefits from the participation of a consortium that consists of University Institutes of the Vienna University of Technology and the Vienna University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, infrastructure construction developers (ÖBB, ASFiNAG, Wiener Linien) as well as engineering companies and research laboratories. At the forefront of research there is the development of a new evaluation pattern which for the first time facilitates the prognosis of the vital processes which are influenced by the structure support behavior. “Our project partners - ÖBB, ASFiNAG, and Wiener Linien – are interested in a close to reality prognosis of the tunnel safety level under fire impact. Moreover, we have to answer questions regarding issues such as the need for a temporary support and the extent of the necessary restructuring measures for different fire scenarios,” adds Lackner.

Daniela Ausserhuber | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tuwien.ac.at/index.php?id=5186
http://www.tuwien.ac.at/pr

More articles from Architecture and Construction:

nachricht Smart buildings through innovative membrane roofs and façades
31.08.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht Concrete from wood
05.07.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Architecture and Construction >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>