Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Course to Focus on Green Construction

12.12.2008
Construction management Department at UALR offers a new course this spring teaching builders the techniques of building environmentally friendly new construction and retrofitting existing business to be more green.

Beginning in the spring, budding construction managers at UALR -- the University of Arkansas at Little Rock -- and around the world can learn building strategies and techniques to make their structures more environmentally friendly – just in time for a green revolution consumers are waging and the incoming Obama administration is encouraging.

James K. Carr, associate professor of construction management in UALR’s Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology, said the senior-level course will be offered online.

“The course will be based on LEED standards, but not necessarily teach the LEED test. The course will incorporate those things” Carr said, referring to the Leadership in Energy and Environment Design certification program.

“Students will pick existing buildings and study how the structure is meeting those standards and study how that particular building can be made more sustainable, more green.”

One topic will be how builders and designers can harvest naturally occurring resources for long-term savings for building owners. Students will examine active and passive solar systems to harvest sunlight or collecting rainwater to flush toilets or water gardens.

“There are extremes you can go to; we’re not going to emphasize that, but we will talk about it,” he said.

How green can a building get?

“It can get extreme,” Carr said. “There are some systems where you can take even the water that comes out of the toilet and use it as drinking water. That’s what I call an extreme. It’s doable, but you have to change your attitude when you get into something like that.”

Carr said green systems and products sometimes can add to the cost of construction or renovation, but he said consumers are increasingly going green – even if costs are higher at the outset – because they know they will save utility costs in the long run. And reducing one’s carbon footprint is becoming more and more popular.

He suspects the new course will be popular. Last spring, the National Association of Homebuilders began offering a short course on green building, and it became one of the most popular courses the association has ever offered.

Carr said a professional enrolling in his new course won’t receive any special certification, but the knowledge students will acquire will assist in acquiring LEED certification.

Carr’s college is practicing what he preaches. UALR’s new engineering and information technology building currently under construction on the northwest area of the campus will incorporate numerous techniques and systems the construction management students will learn in Carr’s class.

The construction industry is the nation's largest industry, employing more than 10 percent of the nation’s workforce. Construction management graduates from UALR are equipped to meet the technical challenges of the 21st century and the highly specialized demands of the modern construction industry.

For more information about UALR’s new green construction class, contact Carr at jkcarr@ualr.edu or visit UALR’s website for enrollment information at www.ualr.edu.

Carr | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ualr.edu

More articles from Architecture and Construction:

nachricht Smart homes will “LISTEN” to your voice
17.01.2017 | EML European Media Laboratory GmbH

nachricht Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes
16.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

All articles from Architecture and Construction >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks

22.02.2017 | Innovative Products

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>