Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

How will tree diseases react to climate change?

23.03.2010
New project helps land managers understand interactions of climate change, pathogens and forests

Under a changing climate, patterns of forest disturbance are expected to change, but how will forest diseases respond? A summary of scientific information that addresses this question is now available on the Internet at http://www.fs.fed.us/psw/topics/insect_disease/.

The site includes a searchable bibliography. The summary, titled "Review of Literature on Climate Change and Forest Diseases of Western North America" is sponsored by the USDA Forest Service.

Currently the forested area annually infected by insects and pathogens in the United States is approximately 45 times the area affected by fire, with an economic impact almost five times as great. The literature review shows climate change generally will lead to reductions in tree health and will improve conditions for some highly damaging pathogens.

Citations and summaries for over 1000 records of journal articles and working papers on forest pathogens and climate are retrievable by author, topic, species, or geographic area. Search the on-line annotated bibliography to discover these and other examples:

Sudden Oak Death is driven by extreme weather events where heavy rains during warm periods create optimal conditions for Phytophthora to reproduce and infect oaks.

An outbreak of Red Band Needle Blight on lodgepole pine is associated with increased summer precipitation that was beyond the range of previously recorded weather patterns.

The Alaska-yellow-cedar decline mystery was solved by noticing that areas with abundant dead yellow-cedar experienced temperatures that were relatively lower in the winter with reduced snowpack. The mortality is caused by earlier snow melt, exposing the yellow cedar's shallow roots to colder temperatures resulting in freeze injury and death.

This collaborative effort is the first of its kind to synthesize the information known about the interactions of climate change, pathogens and forests in a systematic and useful way for land managers addressing climate change.

This work is part of a larger Forest Service effort to incorporate climate change into its research, land management and day-to-day business operations. Learn more about the Forest Service Strategic Framework for Responding to Climate Change at http://www.fs.fed.us/climatechange/.

Susan Frankel | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fs.fed.us
http://www.fs.fed.us/climatechange/

Further reports about: Climate change Phytophthora forest diseases insects oaks

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Cascading use is also beneficial for wood
11.12.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht The future of crop engineering
08.12.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>